Lynda: Project Management

I have always been curious and interested in Project Management. The most I knew about it was from observing my Product Owner during my summer internship. Product Owner is somewhat similar to a Project Manager for Agile Methodology in a work environment. I witnessed my PO managing meetings and being a form of communication. It seems as if a PO presents information and reports back to the higher up. But I haven’t gotten a strong understanding of their role especially behind the scenes. So, out...

From Perceptrons to Boltzmann Machines, How Computers Learned to See

When the microprocessor was invented in 1972, the US economic productivity was at a 40 year low. Computers became popular in businesses and homes in following years, and what came next radicalized the economy and business forever. Computers allowed businesses newfound abilities for number crunching, data saving, and word documentation. While computers are revolutionary in their ability to compute repetitive calculations and follow complex programmed instructions, they have never been...

Cat or Dog? Let the Computer Decide

Machine learning has changed, and will continue to change the world around us. Over the course of November, I spent time completing an online Lynda course titled, Deep Learning: Image Recognition by Adam Geitgey. In this course, I learned key concepts about neural networks and built on what I learned in last month’s machine learning course. By the end of this course, I was able to get a toy neural network working and understanding, at a basic level, the different components that play a part in...

Shaping Future Cities Symposium

During my time at the Design Lab, I have been interested in how our work in Open Accessibility can help future students on campus. For example, in the lab we are currently developing tactile maps of the library for the visually impaired. A long-term goal of ours is to, not only produce maps for our university, but to create a workflow so that our research can help other universities do the same.

Grasshopper and its Role in Tactile Maps

As a resident of Open Accessibility here at the Design Lab, I am interested not only in how to make spaces and resources more accessible at our school with the projects I work on, but also how to create workflows for other people – and other schools – to easily follow and do the same for their spaces and resources. The more automated things are, the easier it is for people follow it and do it themselves, especially those who may not have experience or simply do not have the time. So the best...

Rackham DEI Workshop: Entering Communities

Coming into the Citizen Science arm of the Design Lab, I knew I had decent knowledge of one aspect of the activity: the science part. Having extensive education in scientific fields means that I generally understand what the strengths and weaknesses of science are, what a good data collection protocol looks like, and the sorts of things it can tell us about our world. What I joined knowing quite a bit less about was the “people” aspect of citizen science: the part where we have to engage people...

Building Access

Aimi Hamraie visited University of Michigan, as a part of Disability Awareness Month, and shared her well-known book as Building Access: Universal Design and the Politics of Disability. Hamraie shared key points from her book such as strategies for designing and making things more accessible for those with disabilities. She shared history from the time people have been advocating for rights and accessibility to now. Lastly, she discussed her remarkable work at Vanderbilt University with an...

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