Great Lakes Children's Literature: Lecture and SCRC After Hours Open House

Color illustration of a bird flying low over a marsh. Island or peninsula in the background shows a small house amid dark pine trees

Illustration from The Boy Who Ran to the Woods by Jim Harrison, illustrated by Tom Pohrt. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 2000.

The Special Collections Research Center invites you to a Great Lakes Theme semester event today (March 10) at 3:00pm in Room 660D in the Special Collections Research Center on the 6th floor of Hatcher South. Dr. Elizabeth Goodenough will explore the landscapes of the Great Lakes as they shape the lives of children, writers, and illustrators. She offers images and tales of lighthouses and shipwrecks from the inland seas, a biosphere with the power to influence artists forever. Stories of displaced children, indigenous youth, and runaways portray stormy passages. What geography constitutes “home” in picture books, Y/A and graphic novels, legends, and film?  How do we retain and preserve the settings we first encountered? Goodenough investigates how a sense of belonging and becoming abides within, sustaining or haunting a lifetime. In this session we recall regional memories, ideas about nature, and narratives of outdoor exploration. 

Goodenough has taught literature at Harvard, Claremont McKenna, and Sarah Lawrence colleges, and the University of Michigan. She has published several volumes in Childhood Studies, and her award-winning PBS documentary, Where Do the Children Play?, helped initiate a national dialogue on outdoor play.

Immediately following the presentation, please stay (or drop by) for today's Special Collections After Hours Event, The Great Lakes in Children's Literature. Experience the Great Lakes region through the eyes of Michigan children’s authors, including Tom Pohrt, Nancy Willard, and Joan Blos. In addition to published works, we will also have selected archival materials and artwork on display. 

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