Pocket Globe

Using Elly Dekker's Globes at Greenwich as a reference, one can deduce additional information about the globe. Dekker refers to the pocket globes of this vintage as 'Lane' globes or 'Lane—Dudley Adams—Ferguson' globes.1 This is due to an examination of the various editions of pocket globes held in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich and the tracing of the possession of the original copper plates used to create the first of the pocket globes in 1756. The original publisher was James Ferguson, however, Dudley Adams published pocket globes of the same design from at least 1795 to 1808. According to Dekker, Nicolas Lane could have acquired the plates from Dudley Adams after he went bankrupt in 1817.2 The date listed on the University of Michigan's pocket globe would appear to disagree with this hypothesis. As to the name listed on the cartouche (DOLLOND), Dekker states that another globe in the National Maritime Museum collection (WEST OF SOHO SQUARE, LONDON) was labeled with the name of a shop proprietor who previously had not been recorded in connection with globes. This was the first of many establishments where independent retail counters for varied 'fancy goods' were assembled under one roof and served as a forerunner of the modern department store and shopping mall.3

Image of the pocket globe held in the Map Library.

Terrestrial Globe

Date
1809

Provenance
Purchased by the Map Library ca. 1994.

Diameter
2.75 in. (7 cm)

Inscriptions
[North Pacific Ocean: E 165° — W 165°, N 30° — 60°] on a label pasted on: DOLLOND / LONDON / 1809.

Construction
The sphere consists of paper gores over wood, with a metal pivot at both poles. The paper gores are copper-engraved, hand-colored, and varnished. There is an accompanying folding case of wood covered in embossed paper, the interior lining of the case shows an inverted celestial globe.

Cartography
English. Co-ordinates: meridians every 15°. The prime meridian is labeled: Meridian of London. The equator is graduated twice: for degrees [E & W 0° — 180°; numbered 10°, division in 1°] and for hours [twice 0-12 hours west; marked every hour by a Roman numeral (I-XII), division 4 minutes]; it is labeled : Equinoctial Line. The elliptic is graduated [12 times 0° — 30°; numbered every 10°, division 1°] and provided with the symbols of the zodiac. There is a latitude scale along the meridian through W 165° [N & S 0° — 90°; numbered every 10°, division 1°]. There are labels for the Artic Circle, the Tropic of Cancer, the Tropic of Capricorn, and The Antarctic Circle.

Geographical Notes: monsoons are marked in The Indian Sea and the China Sea (although the China Sea is not labeled). California is represented as a peninsula. Australia is labeled NEW HOLLAND and has additional labels of Dimens Ld. (in the NW), Carpentaria (in the NE), New South Wales (in the SE; Pt Jackson is shown in New South Wales) and Lewins Ld. (in the SW). Tasmania is shown as an island and also listed as Dimens Ld. There is a note on Cook’s death. Owhyhee / Here C. Cook / was Kill’d / 14 Feb 1779. The location of the Antipodes of LONDON is marked. In South America, there is a label: Gold Mines. There is a compass drawn in the Ethiopian Sea.

Tracks: Ansons going out, Ansons return, Capt. Cook’s Track.

Ocean names: FROZEN OCEAN (N & S), THE WESTERN or ATLANTIC OCEAN, THE ETHIOPIC OCEAN, THE INDIAN SEA, THE EASTERN OCEAN, THE PACIFIC OCEAN or GREAT SOUTH SEA.


Footnotes

  1. Dekker, Elly, and Silke Ackermann. Globes At Greenwich: a Catalogue of the Globes And Armillary Spheres In the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Oxford: Oxford University Press and the National Maritime Museum, 1999, pp. 127-128.
  2. Ibid.,  p. 393.
  3. Ibid., p. 517.

Page maintained by Nicole Scholtz
Last modified: 11/14/2011