Research Tips from Taubman Health Sciences Library

Topics covered:

Journal title abbreviations
Article Citation Counts
Copyright Information
Database Searching Help
Access for Alumni
Locating Health Sciences Databases other than Medline
Locating Drug Related Literature
Locating article full text
Journal Impact Factors
Instructions for Authors
Determining if a journal is available on line
Determining if a journal is peer-reviewed
Help with using a database

 

Journal title abbreviations

Journal titles are abbreviated differently in different sources.  For abbreviations in Health Sciences sources, a good place to look is the PubMed journals database.  You can search either by abbreviation or full title.

The Journal/Book information tab of the LibGuide "Scientific Writing and Publishing for Health Sciences" also lists some helpful sources.

Also, two print sources are available if the above online sources are not helpful:

Periodical Title Abbreviations
CASSI: Chemical Abstracts Service Source Index

 

Article Citation Counts

Several resources can help you find out how many times an article has been cited.  One of the most commonly used is Web of Science,  which is linked in the "Quick Links" section on the lower left side of our homepage. From the Web of Knowledge homepage, follow these steps:

  1. Locate your article via a normal search; "times cited" should be displayed both in the list of results and in the full record for the article.

    If you can't find your article, proceed to step 2:
  2. Click on “Cited Ref Search” in the main search screen.
  3. Fill in the boxes using the format shown. Author and Year may be sufficient depending on how prolific the author is.
  4. Select all variants of the article/work since this database includes correct and incorrect citation information from bibliographies.
  5. Click on the "Finish Search" button to see all the items which cited your article/work.

 

Other resources that will provide this information are Scopus and Google Scholar. Simply look up your article in either source. In Scopus, "cited by" should be displayed in the initial list of results (right hand side of the screen), and in the full record for a given article. In Google Scholar the number of times the article has been cited will be displayed after the entry in the initial list of results; the number is a clickable link leading to a list of the citing articles.

 

Copyright Information

Please consult the Library Copyright Office's website for more assistance and information; this office can be contacted via email at copyright@umich.edu.  

If you have specific legal questions pertaining to the University of Michigan, please contact the Office of the General Counsel.

 

Database Searching Help

The University of Michigan Library offers access to a wide variety of databases which offer article citations and links to other information sources in a wide range of subjects.  Links to a number of the most commonly used databases in the Health Sciences, as well as tutorials on running an effective search may be found in the "THL Database Searching" section of our Research Guide titled "Guides and Tutorials".  For a full list of all guides in the field of health sciences, please consult this list of databases.

Also, please note that the U-M Library Search is the gateway to all databases and other online resources in all subject areas which are available to University Library patrons; databases will be just one of the categories searched at that link.  You can also search for databases only, and it is also possible to browse databases by subject heading.

If you work on the Medical Campus, or for the Medical School, College of Pharmacy, School of Public Health, School of Dentistry or School of Nursing please feel free to contact the Informationist assigned to your School or Department for individual guidance and assistance.  You can also call 734-764-1210 or email thlibrary@umich.edu.

 

Access for Alumni

Please consult the University Library's page on Alumni Services.

 

Locating Health Sciences Databases other than Medline

If you are searching for databases in the Health Sciences besides Medline, links to a number of commonly used resources, as well as tutorials on running an effective search may be found in the "THL Database Searching" section of our Research Guide titled "Guides and Tutorials".  For a full list of all guides in the field of health sciences, please consult this list of databases.

For databases in other subject areas, the U-M Library Search is the gateway to all resources in all subject areas which are available to University Library patrons. You can also search for databases only, and it is also possible to browse databases by subject heading.

If you work on the Medical Campus, or for the Medical School, College of Pharmacy, School of Public Health, School of Dentistry or School of Nursing please feel free to contact the Informationist assigned to your School or Department for individual guidance and assistance.  You can also call 734-764-1210 or e-mail thlibrary@umich.edu (thlibrary@umich.edu).

 

Locating Drug Related Literature

Please consult our Resarch Guide on Pharmacy and Pharmacology.

 

Locating article full text

To find the full text of an article in the field of Health Sciences, one of the easiest tools to use is the PubMed Single Citation Matcher.  You will see a link to the Single Citation Matcher in the center column on PubMed's front page.  Insert a few pieces of information in the appropriate boxes, e.g., an author’s last name, a title word, a beginning page number.  If your article is found, click on the underlined authors and then the MGetIt icon to see if full-text is available.

If your article is not found, another resource to try is the MGet It Citation Linker, which searches literature from many databases across several disciplines.

If you still cannot find your article, you can try searching for the journal in the U-M Library Catalog Search. Enter the title of your journal and then use the various filters available in the left hand column to narrow down your results.  Even if you cannot find your article in the PubMed or MGetIt citation linkers, it is possible UM may actually have it the journal online or you can find out which libraries own it in print.  If we have the journal volume and issue in print, it is possible to request a copy of the article by following the “Get This” link in the catalog record.

For more assistance please email thlibrary@umich.edu.

 

Journal Impact Factors 

The tool that lists the impact factors of various journals is the Journal Citation Reports (JCR).  Follow this link to find specific journals.

For more information on searching the Journal Citation Reports, please consult the "Journal Citation Report" tab on the "Ressearch Impact Metrics: Citation Analysis" Research Guide.

 

Instructions for Authors

The Instructions for Authors web site provides links to instructions for most biomedical journals. If you don’t find a journal in this list, use Google to see if the journal has a homepage with instructions.

 

Determining if a journal is available on line

The Library Online Journals Search is a convenient way to find online journals. Note that you can also browse journals by title or subject category. If your journal isn’t listed, be sure to check Library Catalog Search just to verify that it isn’t online, and you can also find which libraries have print copies available.

 

Determining if a journal is peer-reviewed

If you need to know if a given journal is peer-reviewed, the best source to check is Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Look for a graphic of a referee's shirt which indicates that a journal is "refereed", i.e. peer-reviewed.

Please note that some databases such as Proquest and CINAHL allow you to limit your search results to peer-reviewed journals.  Also, the journal's Instructions for Authors will usually include the title’s review policy.

Peer-reviewed articles have been subjected to expert scrutiny before publication and are presumed to be more reliable than articles which have not.  A peer reviewed article is presented by the journal editor to other experts in the field (the author's peers), who will offer their judgment on the study's methodology, conclusions, and overall contribution to the field.  The reviewers then recommend whether the article should be published, revised before publication, or not published at all. These recommendations are not binding on the journal editor, but they carry great weight.

Peer review is usually a double-blind process, where the reviewer does not know who wrote the paper and the author does not know who wrote the review comments (single-blind means the reviewer knows who the author is, but not vice-versa).  This is intended to ensure that comments are based on the merits of the research and not on the reputation of the author or other possible biasing factors.

 

Help with using a database

If you need help in using a particular database, you should first consult the help functions in the database, which may provide a quick solution to your problem. You could also search for the particular database in the Library's Research Guides to see if tutorials or other resources are available there.

For individualized assistance, please feel free to contact the Informationist for your School/Department/subject area directly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Last modified: 03/12/2019