Samuel Clarke

The theologian and philosopher Samuel Clarke (1675-1729) is perhaps best remembered for his theological writings and Boyle lectures, in which he exposed the principle that any interpretation of the Christian doctrine had to be based on the scriptures alone (sola scriptura). But he was also an accomplished translator and editor. In 1706, he translated Newton’s Opticks into Latin. And in 1729, he published his edition of the first twelve books of the Iliad. Only three years later, the last twelve books were published by his son, Samuel Clarke. As the images show, this 1759 edition also incorporates notes by other scholars. In brief, the book is heavily annotated. For instance, the first page of the Iliad displays just the first two verses, which are in turn followed by comprehensive notes.

ΟΜΗΡΟΥ ΑΠΑΝΤΑ. Η. Ε Homeri opera omnia, ex recensione et cum notis Samuelis Clarkii, s.t.p.

ΟΜΗΡΟΥ ΑΠΑΝΤΑ. Η. Ε Homeri opera omnia, ex recensione et cum notis Samuelis Clarkii, s.t.p. Leipzig: G. Theophilus Georgius, 1759.

ΟΜΗΡΟΥ ΑΠΑΝΤΑ. Η. Ε Homeri opera omnia, ex recensione et cum notis Samuelis Clarkii, s.t.p.
ΟΜΗΡΟΥ ΑΠΑΝΤΑ. Η. Ε Homeri opera omnia, ex recensione et cum notis Samuelis Clarkii, s.t.p.

Friedrich August Wolf

A Burlesque Translation