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Memoir

Thomas P. Slavens
Regents' Proceedings 346

Thomas P. Slavens, Ph.D., professor of information in the School of Information, retired from active faculty status on May 31, 2003.

Professor Slavens received his B.A. degree from Phillips University in Oklahoma in 1951, his B.D. degree from the Union Theological Seminary in New York in 1954, his M.A. degree from the University of Minnesota in 1962, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan in 1965. He was a member of the clergy from 1952-60, and he was a librarian at the Divinity School at Drake University from 1960-64. Professor Slavens joined the University of Michigan faculty as an instructor in 1965 and was promoted to lecturer and then assistant professor in 1966, associate professor in 1969, and professor in 1977.

Over the years, Professor Slavens taught numerous courses, including the history of books and printing, the history of libraries, and reference methods. He provided his students with a strong foundation in librarianship and a particular focus on the riches of information found in the sources used by reference librarians. He instilled in his students a deep appreciation for the history and traditions of the field, and they have been inspired by his enthusiasm for and dedication to the profession. Professor Slavens chaired the doctoral program, was founding chair of the Alumni-in-Residence Program, and was active in departmental and University-wide committees.

Professor Slavens is internationally known for his extensive bibliography, and some of his publications are classics in the field of reference librarianship. He was elected president of the Association for Library and Information Science Education and was a member of various committees of the American Library Association. Professor Slavens served on the advisory board and as an editor-at-large for a New York publisher, Marcel Dekker, and he provided consulting services to several university libraries around the country.

The Regents now salute this distinguished library and information science educator for his dedicated service by naming Thomas P. Slavens professor emeritus of information.