Using a Pilot Study to Test and Assess a New Instruction Model

Diagram with the words "try, fail, success."

Have you ever attended a workshop and promptly forgot most of what you learned a few days later? Given that library staff teach hundreds of library instruction sessions each semester through training workshops, course-integrated sessions, campus workshops, etc., this is an issue that is probably affecting those who attend our instruction sessions as well. Librarians explored a potential solution to this problem by testing an implementation of "Learning Boosters."

The Value of Being Virtual: User Feedback on Email and Instant Messaging Reference Services

Ask a Librarian service contact methods: IM, email, text, phone

Ask a Librarian email and instant messaging (IM) service providers targeted current users of our virtual reference services during 2016-2017, to gather feedback about our online research and reference service. We wanted to know more about users' motivation for seeking help via email and via IM, as well as users' satisfaction with their online interactions. Additionally, we were interested in gathering users' ideas for future IM service enhancements.

Mixing Research Methods to Improve a Library’s Promotion and Appointment Process

Word cloud: promotion, librarian, interview, focus group, competitative analysis, survey, mixed methods, quantitative, qualitative

Like many academic research libraries, the University of Michigan Library has a promotion process for its librarians. And, like many libraries, the policies need to be reviewed on occasion. The Promotion and Appointment of Librarians (PAL) Task Force was charged by the Librarians’ Forum with reviewing our promotion process and making recommendations to better align what we do with the goals of both individuals and the Library. This Task Force utilized various qualitative and quantitative...

What's Happening in Our Library Spaces?

A picture of six different spaces in different University of Michigan library locations showing students studying, in the Bert's study lounge, in the stacks as well as a picture of the 2nd floor of the Duderstadt Center and an exterior shot of Tappan hall.

There are many ways to record and analyze what is happening in the University of Michigan libraries over time. The more we understand how users are engaging with our spaces, the more we can do to meet their needs. But how do you get a handle on such a big question (library space use)? What data do you collect and how do you break it down?

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