Posts by Pablo Alvarez

A New Online Exhibit from Special Collections: Marks in Books

Spine and front cover of Gulielmus Durandus (ca. 1230-1296) et alii. [Tractatus varii] Paper. Germany 15th c.

We are pleased to announce the launching of our most recent Omeka exhibit: Marks in Books. In this online exhibit, the term "marks" refers to physical elements that have been added to manuscripts and early printed books throughout time, that is, from the instance when they were being made until they arrived to our shelves. Mostly, these marks were not intended by the authors, scribes and printers as they originally envisioned their books, but were later included in the form of...

After Hours in Special Collections: History of the Stars

Folio 121v from Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543). Nicolai Copernici Torinensis de revolutionibus orbium coelestium, Libri VI (Nuremberg: Johannes Petreius, 1543)

You are invited to see highlights from the library's extraordinary collection of manuscripts and early printed books describing the early history of astrology and astronomy. Mark your calendars for this Tuesday (3/12/19; 4:00-7:00 pm). The selection will range from ancient papyri to richly illustrated books that made possible the scientific revolution in Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, including first editions of the works of Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler.

On a Damaged Manuscript and the Weather

Folio 1r from Horace (65-8 BC). Ars Poetica & Epistulae. Parchment. Italy. 15th c.

When cataloging this fifteenth-century Italian manuscript, I saw that some of the pages have been damaged by brushing a chemical reagent on some areas that were difficult to read. While in the short term this substance was designed to make traces of ink more legible, the long-term impact on the manuscript is disastrous as shown in the image below.

New Exhibit: You Must Judge a Book by its Cover! Highlights from the Julia Miller Collection of Bookbinding Models

Model of Scheide Codex, Egypt, 4th-5th century (Scheide Library, Princeton University)

Visit us on the sixth floor of the Hatcher Library to see this exciting exhibit! It consists of a selection of historical bookbinding models from the personal collection of conservator and scholar, Julia Miller. In 2015 and 2016, Julia bequeathed her extensive model collection to the Special Collections Research Center. Now named as The Julia Miller Collection of Bookbinding Models, it includes binding replicas of ancient and medieval manuscripts in various materials and formats, including a...

Kip Thorne and Galileo Galilei

From left to right: Professors Keith Riles, Kip S. Thorne and Gregory Tarlé

Yesterday we were honored by the visit of Kip S. Thorne, the Feyman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus, at Caltech. Before delivering the twenty-sixth annual Ta-You Wu Lecture in Physics, Professor Thorne came to view one of the most remarkable artifacts held in the Special Collections Library: a single-leaf manuscript containing Galileo's own notes of his first observations of the moons of Jupiter in January 1610.

An Exhibit Critique by U-M Student Noah Waldman

Sciatica Amulet; Egypt; in Greek; 1st-5th century AD; Hematite, black; 18 x 23 x 3 mm; SCL-Bonner 40

The Exhibit "The Art and Science of Healing: From Antiquity to the Renaissance" is now gone from the Kelsey Museum and the Audubon Room of the Hatcher Library, but we can still see it through the eyes of undergraduate Noah Waldman, who last semester wrote an exhibit critique for professor Aileen Das' class, "Ancient Medicine in Greece and Rome". Selected by Dr. Das, I am very pleased to post Noah's review in our Special Collections blog.

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