Posts tagged "exhibits"
from Beyond the Reading Room

Coffee and Old Lice? Join us to Celebrate a New Exhibit on the History of the Microscope

Left: Philippe Sylvestre Dufour (1622-1687). Traitez nouveaux & curieux du cafe, du the et du chocolate. Lyon: Jean Baptiste Deville, 1688; Right:

The Special Collections Library will host a reception to celebrate a new exhibit, "Through the Magnifying Glass: A Short History of the Microscope." Please join the exhibit curators, Pablo Alvarez and Gregg Sobocinski, to chat about this exciting display. There will be coffee and other refreshments. Date: April 24 (Friday) 3:00 pm -5:00 pm. Place: Seventh floor of the Hatcher Library.

Singing the Antiphonary: New Online Exhibit and Event at the UMMA

From left to right: Adam Wills Begley, Noah Horn, Austin Stewart, Glenn Miller, Matthew Abernathy, and Dr. Stefano Mengozzi.

On August 26 2014, led by Dr. Stefano Mengozzi, a group of six singers recorded a selection of Gregorian chant music at the St. Thomas Apostle Catholic Church in Ann Arbor. They sang from a fifteenth-century Antiphonary from the Special Collections Library, an extraordinary manuscript copied in Venice and richly illuminated by the Italian miniaturist, Benedetto Bordon.

A New Home for a Historical Microscope

Clamshell box storing a Culpeper-Style English Microscope (ca. 1760)

In 2013, an extraordinary collection on the history of medicine was transferred from the Taubman Library to the Special Collections Library, University of Michigan Library. Among the books, we came across three eighteenth-century microscopes stored in plain boxes and in need of conservation treatment. They have now been repaired and are in new homes. Here is a video explaining in detail the conservation work performed in one of these wonderful microscopes.

Beware! The Grey Drone-Fly is Watching You!

Plate 24, on the eyes and head of the grey drone-fly, from Micrographia. London: John Martyn & James Allestry. Printers of the Royal Society, 1665

This superb engraving depicts what the seventeenth-century English scientist, Robert Hooke, observed when exposing the head of a grey drone-fly through the lens of a microscope. The greatest section of the head was nothing else but two large “protuberant bunches,” mostly covered by thousands of tiny hemispheres arranged in “triagonal order”.

Join us for Jell-O! Exhibit opening reception and talk, 1-12-2015 4:30pm

Three women sit on a carpet around a low table sharing Turkish coffee and pastries, The women form a circle, which is visually mirrored by the Chocolate Walnut Jell-O dessert below them

Talk and reception to celebrate the upcoming online exhibit "Jell-O: America’s Most Famous Dessert At Home Everywhere." Dr. Nicole Tarulevicz of the School of Humanities at the University of Tasmania speaks at 5:00 p.m. Using materials drawn from the culinary ephemera holdings of the Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive at U-M Library, the exhibit explores how the Jell-O company’s early 20th century advertising used depictions of the exotic to sell the product to Americans.

Diverse City: Jell-0

Image of Eve picking an apple from a Jell-O advertisement

Early 20th century advertising materials for Jell-O contain striking representations of age, race, class, gender, nationality, regionality, and other vectors of identity; whether self-defined or other-imposed. In January, we’ll unveil a digital exhibit, guest curated by Dr. Nicole Tarulevicz, on depictions of the exotic in early 20th century Jell-O advertising. There will be an exhibit opening and reception, with a talk by Dr. Tarulevicz, January 12th, 4:30-6pm, in the Hatcher Gallery

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