Following the peregrinations of Isl. Ms. 350: Part 2, From Istanbul to Ann Arbor

Map showing significant locations for the journey of Islamic Manuscript 350, including Delhi, London, Istanbul, Florence, Cairo, and Ann Arbor

The manuscript currently preserved in our library under the shelfmark Isl. Ms. 350 has a fascinating history that can be traced in internal owners’ marks and external documentary sources. Produced in Delhi, the manuscript was acquired by the library in 1924 along with several hundred other manuscripts from Istanbul that came to be known as the "Abdul Hamid Collection." How did these manuscripts reach Ann Arbor? Read the intriguing story in this second of two posts!

"Not all who wander are lost:" Assessing Unprocessed Collections at the University of Michigan

Photo of shelves with boxes

There's a moment of suspense every time I remove the lid of an archival box. What will I find inside? Folders of nineteenth-century correspondences in French? A civil war diary with a bullet hole in its leather cover? A pile of pamphlets about applying makeup for transwomen? A random letter signed by J.R.R. Tolkien? (Yes, I really did find one!) After five weeks in the archives unit of the Special Collections Library, I have come to realize that I never really know what I will find...

Following the peregrinations of Isl. Ms. 350 | Part 1: From Delhi to Istanbul

Former owners' marks seen on front flyleaf of Isl. Ms. 350

The manuscript currently preserved in our library under the shelfmark Isl. Ms. 350 has a fascinating history that can be traced in internal owners’ marks and external documentary sources. Produced in Delhi, the manuscript was acquired by the library in 1924 along with several hundred other manuscripts from Istanbul that came to be known as the "Abdul Hamid Collection." How did the manuscript end up in Istanbul? Read the intriguing story in this first of two posts!

Next Week at the Michigan Theater | Jeremiah Tower: The Last Magnificent

Menu including Red and yellow tomato salad with goat cheese mozzerella and pancetta, Japanese eggplant timable with chilied crab, sauteed prawns with basil risotta or poached salmon with potato gratin and mushroom hollandaise or grilled bacon wrapped fillet of beeef with fire-onion brinoise. Includessignatures by celebraties

The Michigan Theater will be showing Jeremiah Tower: The Last Magnificent next Tuesday, May 30 (4:15pm, 7:00pm, 9:15pm) and Wednesday, May 31 (4:15pm, 7:00pm, 9:15pm). Arrive early, and you may catch a peek at a slideshow of menus from Jeremiah Tower’s personal menu collection, housed here at the University of Michigan Special Collections Library in the Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive.

An Exhibit Critique by U-M Student Noah Waldman

Sciatica Amulet; Egypt; in Greek; 1st-5th century AD; Hematite, black; 18 x 23 x 3 mm; SCL-Bonner 40

The Exhibit "The Art and Science of Healing: From Antiquity to the Renaissance" is now gone from the Kelsey Museum and the Audubon Room of the Hatcher Library, but we can still see it through the eyes of undergraduate Noah Waldman, who last semester wrote an exhibit critique for professor Aileen Das' class, "Ancient Medicine in Greece and Rome". Selected by Dr. Das, I am very pleased to post Noah's review in our Special Collections blog.

Illustrations in Rare Books: A Workshop

Teaching Space at the Special Collections Library, Hatcher 806

As part of last week's Enriching Scholarship events, I offered an introductory workshop on the subject of illustrations in early printed books. In brief, the participants of this session learned not only about how these extraordinary images were created but also about how to identify the details of their production by examining actual books. For each book the following question was raised: are these illustrations woodcuts, engravings, or lithographs? We all had great fun!

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