Posts tagged "User Research"

Strategies to Improve Participation in User Research and Assessment Activities

Photo taken above a busy crowd. Some figures are actively walking and their figure is blurred from their movement. Others figures are clear and sharp and they are standing, talking to or watching other people in the crowd.

How can we improve the familiarity and credibility between Library experts, resources and services we offer and the students, faculty and staff who use them? Whether we’re building new relationships or reconnecting with patrons/colleagues during assessment or user research activities, we have the opportunity to use certain marketing and communication best practices and tools during our user research to align clear and targeted communication with our key audiences.

Personas: Practical Application for the U-M Library Website Redesign Project

Persona for undergraduate student.

The first post ("Personas: A Classic User Experience Design Technique") in this 2-part series described what personas are and, generally, how to create them. I closed with some cautions about ways personas might come out less than helpful – creating flat, overloaded, or fake (unresearched) personas. The second post presents our persona development for a specific website project.

Personas: A Classic User Experience Design Technique

Composite image of photos of individuals.

Personas are employed in user experience design work to help design teams create or improve systems, spaces, and services with targeted populations in mind. Libraries use personas as archetypes to maximize effective library user experiences. This is the first of two posts about the creation and use of personas in the U-M Library.

Integrating Feedback on the Fly: Intercept Interviews

Flyer which encourages participation in intercept interview: 10 minutes for a chance at 10 dollars.

When developing or reconsidering a library service, sometimes you can get stuck in your head. You go back and forth with your colleagues proposing different ways of doing things. You model out different scenarios, do an environmental scan, read the literature, weigh pros and cons but you still can’t decide how to proceed. A great way to figure out how to move forward is to go to your users for feedback by employing intercept interviews.

The Value of Being Virtual: User Feedback on Email and Instant Messaging Reference Services

Ask a Librarian service contact methods: IM, email, text, phone

Ask a Librarian email and instant messaging (IM) service providers targeted current users of our virtual reference services during 2016-2017, to gather feedback about our online research and reference service. We wanted to know more about users' motivation for seeking help via email and via IM, as well as users' satisfaction with their online interactions. Additionally, we were interested in gathering users' ideas for future IM service enhancements.

Collaboration, Creativity, and Data Analysis: How the Library Works to Foster Community

As a Library Environments Support Team member-- everything I do, centers around delighting the students and faculty and creating environments conducive to sharing, learning, growing, and accessibility. From observing how many people use the book drop box, to helping to create a workshop dedicated to having students envision their perfect “Library of the Future.”

What's Happening in Our Library Spaces?

A picture of six different spaces in different University of Michigan library locations showing students studying, in the Bert's study lounge, in the stacks as well as a picture of the 2nd floor of the Duderstadt Center and an exterior shot of Tappan hall.

There are many ways to record and analyze what is happening in the University of Michigan libraries over time. The more we understand how users are engaging with our spaces, the more we can do to meet their needs. But how do you get a handle on such a big question (library space use)? What data do you collect and how do you break it down?

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