Posts on September 2017

New Exhibit Creates Rare View of Campus History

In honor of the University of Michigan’s bicentennial, the Stephen S. Clark Library highlights the University of Michigan’s Ann Arbor campus both before its creation and throughout its continuous evolution. Depicting the Ann Arbor area before the establishment of the city, the exhibit celebrates the Native American community and highlights its presence throughout the decades. Featuring the work of famous architects such as Alexander Jackson Davis, Albert Kahn, and Eero Saarinen, Creating a...

New Games and a Nintendo Switch

Nintendo Switch

The CVGA has quite a few new games available for play. We also have a Nintendo Switch available, with several games to go with it. Did you know that there's an RSS feed on our main page that lists all games that were recently added to our collection? Check out our main page for more details.

Starting the Conversation with the LIT Tech Diversity Reading Club

Image of many colored pencils

In line with the University of Michigan Library's strategic plan to support diversity, individuals in the Library Information Technology division started a Diversity Reading Club where colleagues can come together to lean and discuss readings on the subject. The Reading Club has been going for over a year and a half, and we discuss what it is and why we think it works.

Glass Houses by Louise Penny

Cover of Glass Houses by Louise Penny

Glass Houses is the latest entry in Louise Penny’s long-running mystery series featuring Chief Superintendent Armand Gamache of the Sûreté de Québec, who lives in the tiny village of Three Pines. After Three Pines' Halloween party, a mysterious figure in a black cloak haunts the village green. Two days later, the figure disappears, but the body of a woman, a visitor to Three Pines, is found wearing the cloak. The story of the murder alternates with the trial of the person accused of it...

Kip Thorne and Galileo Galilei

From left to right: Professors Keith Riles, Kip S. Thorne and Gregory Tarlé

Yesterday we were honored by the visit of Kip S. Thorne, the Feyman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus, at Caltech. Before delivering the twenty-sixth annual Ta-You Wu Lecture in Physics, Professor Thorne came to view one of the most remarkable artifacts held in the Special Collections Library: a single-leaf manuscript containing Galileo's own notes of his first observations of the moons of Jupiter in January 1610.


Page 1 of 2