Posts on June 2018

Midnight in the Piazza by Tiffany Parks

Cover of Midnight in the Piazza by Tiffany Parks

Midnight in the Piazza is a delightful art mystery written for children ages 8-12, even though anyone can enjoy it. Thirteen-year-old Beatrice Archer moves to Rome when her father gets a job there, and she falls in love with the turtle fountain in the piazza outside her apartment. Then one night she sees someone trying to steal the turtles from the fountain. Beatrice and a new friend, an Italian boy who speaks English, decide to investigate, and they discover a ring of international art...

Book Displays for June

Water display

We have two new displays in the 2nd floor lobby area of the Duderstadt Center, both of which highlight materials from the Art, Architecture & Engineering Library collection. The first display showcases materials about the art, science and politics of water, and the second display showcases anthologies of comics newspaper dailies.

Appointment in Arezzo by Alan Taylor

Cover of Appointment in Arezzo by Alan Taylor

Scottish journalist Alan Taylor writes about his friendship with Muriel Spark, author of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, during the last decade and a half of her life. We learn about her life in rural Tuscany, her estrangement from her only son, her complex feelings about her native Scotland, and the teacher who inspired the character of Miss Brodie.

Let’s Talk About Surveys (Part 2)

happy face with a check mark next to it followed by a neutral and sad faces

Continuing the discussion about survey design (see Let's Talk about Surveys, Part 1), you’ve decided a survey is an appropriate methodology for what you want to find out and are thinking about what questions you want to ask. But how you ask these questions and structure them within the survey itself, as well as the question formats and options you give people for responding all require careful consideration.

Let’s Talk About Surveys (Part 1)

happy face with a check mark next to it followed by a neutral and sad faces

Doing a survey is often the default research method thought of when you need to answer questions about what people like, expect, or want, among other things. While surveys are likely to be considered the easiest option, you can’t conflate “easy to create” with “easy to create well.” Even if a survey is an appropriate methodology for the question you’re looking to answer, the questions you ask, the way you ask them, and the options you give people for responding all require a thoughtful approach...

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