Videos

Library Engagement Symposium: Student Panel, Day 2

Date: 
April 1, 2016
Running Time: 
48:32

Student Panel:

Students from the Student Engagement Program discuss project work and how working at the library has deepened their perspective on academic life at the University of Michigan.

Join us for any or all of the sessions that are part of the Library Engagement Symposium.

Maria Buczkowski, BA '16 Political Science and History
Engagement Collaborative, Social Media Outreach Team Leader
 The Engagement Collaborative is a unique leadership opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to actively engage the campus community. Team members collaborate with librarians, staff, and students to increase outreach and awareness using social media and to design and implement new library event programming tailored for students, by students.

Mena Hermiz, BA '16 International Studies
MPortfolio Peer Leader
. Through one­-on­-one and small group advising, the undergraduate MPortfolio Peer Leader supports fellow students who are developing eportfolios as part of courses, academic and/or co-curricular programs.

Beatriz Lozano, BFA '16, Art
 Student Mini­Grant Recipient
At Leesta, we help children develop empathy and cultural competence by bringing women to the forefront of U.S. history education. Our team designs digital games for 3rd­ - 5th graders that engage them in new narratives of U.S. history — ones that are inspired by women.

Brandon Patterson, MA '16 Higher Education, MSI '17 Human­-Computer Interaction and Learning Technologies
MPortfolio Program Assistant (Graduate Student Intern)
 The program assistant works closely with library professionals to coordinate student engagement initiatives, facilitate workshops, manage communications and events, and provide peer­-to­-peer mentoring.

Maria-­Carolina Simao, PhD '17 Resource Ecology Management
Engagement Fellow, Wolverine Podcast Project Manager
 Wolverine Podcast Fellows will produce a series of short audio narratives (podcasts) comprising interviews and stories about students’ experiences during their first year at the University of Michigan. The fellows will use storytelling and audio engineering to craft compelling narratives from all across campus and share them with a broad audience.

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Last modified: 04/01/2016

Library Engagement Symposium

Date: 
March 31, 2016
Running Time: 
112:48

Jennifer Nutefall, University Librarian at Santa Clara University, highlights connections between universities and their communities, the role of engaged learning, and the importance of research and partnerships with librarians. She says,
"As questions of the value and importance of higher education continue to be raised by the media, politicians, parents, and students how can universities and libraries respond? One response is to become more engaged with their communities and supporting research and activities that directly benefit their town, city, and state."

Student Panel, Engagement Fellows
Library Engagement Fellows discuss their leadership roles and projects that explore the intersection of libraries, engaged learning, and the experiences of students and instructors.
iTeam — Exploring Integrative Tools for Engagement at Michigan Celia Ettinger (BA '16 Sociology & Women's Studies) Mengjie (Jenny) Yang (MS '16 Environmental Education)
iTeam Fellows are conducting qualitative campus research to learn how Michigan students are preparing for and debriefing from their engaged learning experiences and how digital tools could help. Based on these findings — gleaned primarily through personal interviews — they are developing a digital toolkit that supports student engagement through reflection, integration, experimentation, and application of knowledge in real­-world settings.
Wolverine Podcast — Telling Stories About First Experiences at Michigan Erica Lignell (BA '16 Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies) Maria-­Carolina Simao (PhD '17 Resource Ecology Management) Elizabeth Vana (BA '16 Communications)

The Wolverine Podcast is a series of short audio narratives comprising interviews and stories about students' experiences during their first year at Michigan and beyond. Wolverine Podcast Fellows use storytelling and audio engineering to craft compelling narratives from around campus and share them with a broad audience. It is increasingly important to hear and understand different perspectives so that we can all grow together.

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Last modified: 04/01/2016

Keeping Cool and Getting Hot: The Philosophic Firepower of Yoruba Civilization

Date: 
March 24, 2016
Running Time: 
73:12

Robert Farris Thompson, Colonel John Trumbull Professor of the History of Art at Yale University, lived in the Yoruba region of southwest Nigeria for many years while he conducted research of Yoruba arts history. He's one of America's most prominent scholars of African art. The talk, 4-5:30 pm, will be followed by a reception, 5:30-7:30 pm. Beginning with an article on Afro-Cuban dance and music (published in 1958), Thompson has dedicated his life to the study of art history of the Afro-Atlantic world. His first book was Black Gods and Kings, which was a close reading of the art history of the Yoruba people. The Zora Neale Hurston Lecture at the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies honors Hurston, the most prolific African-American woman writer of her time, who brought to life the power, richness and complexity of black cultures for many readers.

 

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Last modified: 04/01/2016

The Tragedy of Fatherhood: King Laius and the Politics of Paternity in the West

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
March 16, 2016
Running Time: 
73:48

Silke-Maria Weineck, chair of Comparative Literature and professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature at U-M, talks about her recent book, The Tragedy of Fatherhood: King Laius and the Politics of Paternity in the West, and is then joined in conversation by Jonathan Freedman, U-M professor of English, American and Jewish Studies.
If tragedy is the violent eruption of a necessary conflict between competing, legitimate claims, Weineck argues that fatherhood is an essentially tragic structure. A long history of fatherhood in literature, philosophy, and political thought, The Tragedy of Fatherhoodweaves together figures as seemingly disparate as Aristotle, Freud, Kafka, and Kleist, to produce a stunning reappraisal of the nature of power in the Western tradition.

 

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Last modified: 03/17/2016

Community Share-a-thon

Series: 
ePortfolio
Date: 
March 15, 2016
Running Time: 
84:00

Each year, we dedicate an ePortfolio Special Interest Group gathering to sharing the great work of our campus community. To this end, we invite very brief mini-talks by faculty, staff, and student leaders on any topic related to eportfolios, reflection, assessment, badges, and integrative and engaged learning. Past topics have included critical reflection, visual thinking strategies, and eportfolios for international students. The event is a great way to learn a lot and connect with new colleagues in a short amount of time.

 

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Last modified: 03/17/2016

Take Back the Archive: Advocacy by Design

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
March 7, 2016
Running Time: 
70:12

Purdom Lindblad, head of graduate programs in the Scholars’ Lab at the University of Virginia Library, discusses the Take Back the Archive project. She says, "Starting with the premise that, for making to matter in the humanities, we must focus making in ways that encourage attention to—and advocacy for—the humane. Regardless of whether the act of making is one of production, praxis, theory, or a combination of the three, thoughtful making in the humanities should forefront reflection on human experiences and impacts. Centered on the Take Back the Archive project, this talk will explore what it means to make things in humane, empathetic ways—and how can we create spaces and foster relationships to focus on humane, empathetic making in the humanities?"

 

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Last modified: 03/11/2016

Emergent Research: Computational Analysis of Marginalized Cultural Production

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
February 22, 2016
Running Time: 
63:36

What unique opportunities and challenges arise when applying computational methods to study the creative output of marginalized people? Cora Johnson-Roberson, Ph.D candidate in Ethnomusicology at Brown University and pursuing a secondary master's in Computer Science, discusses the use of topic modeling to analyze over 18,000 texts drawn from the Original Hip-Hop Lyrics Archive, charting the geographical and temporal distribution of different themes within the corpus. She addresses the practical issues and findings of this analysis and explores the broader question of how computational methods can help us speak back to reductive narratives about black life and cultural production.

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Last modified: 03/17/2016

Water Access and Management in Communities of Color: Who Else? Who's Next? What Now?

Date: 
February 19, 2016
Running Time: 
121:48

Panelists from Flint, Detroit, and Muskegon Heights discuss issues around water access and management and its impact on communities of color.
Sponsored by Multi Ethnic Student Affairs (MESA) in recognition of Black History Month.

 

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Last modified: 02/20/2016

The Importance of Social Factors in L2 Pronunciation Learning

Date: 
February 19, 2016
Running Time: 
64:12

John Levis, professor of Applied Linguistics and TESL at Iowa State University, while not minimizing the importance of age-related constraints or experience using the language, argues that attention to social factors is essential to more effective pronunciation teaching for adult second language learners. He presents his research and then suggests several adjustments to language teaching that integrate social factors into L2 pronunciation pedagogy.

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Last modified: 02/19/2016

Authors' Forum: The Jim Crow Routine: Everyday Performances of Race and the End of Segregation in Mississippi

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
February 9, 2016
Running Time: 
78:36

Stephen Berrey, U-M assistant professor of American culture and history, talks with Angela Dillard, U-M Earl Lewis Collegiate Professor of Afroamerican and African Studies, about Berrey's recent book, The Jim Crow Routine: Everyday Performances of Race and the End of Segregation in Mississippi.
The South's system of Jim Crow racial oppression is usually understood in terms of legal segregation that mandated the separation of white and black Americans. Yet, as Berrey shows, it was also a high-stakes drama that played out in the routines of everyday life, where blacks and whites regularly interacted on sidewalks and buses and in businesses and homes. Every day, individuals made, unmade, and remade Jim Crow in how they played their racial roles—how they moved, talked, even gestured. The highly visible but often subtle nature of these interactions constituted the Jim Crow routine.

 

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Last modified: 02/11/2016

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