Videos

Library Diversity Celebration

Date: 
May 24, 2016
Running Time: 
11:00

Library Diversity Celebration Opening remarks: Darlene Nichols and Jacqueline Freeman, Address: Dean James Hilton, Diversity award presentation.

 

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Last modified: 06/02/2016

Emergent Research: Making Sense of Twitter Data with Josh Pacek

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
May 23, 2016
Running Time: 
87:36

Dr. Josh Pasek, Assistant Professor of Communication Studies and Faculty Associate, Center for Political Studies, at the University of Michigan, gives the Emergent Research lecture for May. He says,"Data from online social networks are increasingly applied to pressing social questions. But despite the widespread use of social media data, analyses to date have not been coupled with a clear understanding of what social media data represent. This talk provides a brief look into an ongoing research project to understand how Twitter data, in particular, relate to other forms of social measurement. In it, I discuss theoretical and practical considerations when comparing traditional forms of social analysis with social media data as well as results of some preliminary analyses. These considerations provide a basis for thinking about what social media data can and cannot currently accomplish as a tool for social measurement."

 

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Last modified: 06/02/2016

Advanced Leadership Program 2015 - 2016 Library Showcase

Date: 
May 9, 2016
Running Time: 
116:24

The Advanced Leadership Program (ALP) through the Center for the Education of Women is a competitive leadership development program for U-M staff. The 2015-2016 ALP cohort includes an unusually large number of professionals from the University Library, including five staff and librarians representing four library divisions, including Collections, Learning and Teaching, Publishing, and Research. During this year-end showcase, library participants from this year’s cohort share their program takeaways and the outcomes of their respective independent change projects. Presenters Include: Merrie Fuller, Linda Knox, Carrie Luke, Renée Tambeau, and Keiko Yokota-Carter

 

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Last modified: 06/02/2016

An Interview with Dr. Jack Shaheen on Arab and Muslim Stereotypes Over the Last Four Decades

Date: 
April 11, 2016
Running Time: 
79:48

Evelyn Alsultany, Director of Arab and Muslim American Studies, interviews Jack Shaheen about his experiences researching representations of Arabs and Muslims in the U.S. over the last four decades, tapping into his long experience in documenting media images and their connections to anti-Arab and anti-Muslim policies and perceptions. Shaheen is renowned worldwide for his lectures and published work, which illustrate the damaging consequences of stereotyping of Arabs and Muslims. Over the last four decades, Shaheen has collected and analyzed materials that depict Arabs and Muslims as the “godless cultural other.”

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Last modified: 06/02/2016

Strengthening the Huddle: An Interdisciplinary Panel Discussion on Athletes and Mental Health

Date: 
April 8, 2016
Running Time: 
101:24

A panel discusses mental health in athletics. The conversation addresses mental health and stigma among college athletes, mitigating the effects of mental health related to sports, the challenges and successes of addressing mental health, and advocating for the integration of mental health and sports. Panelists include: Barb Hanson, LMSW, U-M Athletic Counselor Tom George, U-M Assistant Professor, Sport Psychology Will Heininger, Program Director of Athletes Connected and Former U-M Football Player Kent Bernard, Olympic Medalist and Former U-M Athlete/Track Coach

 

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Last modified: 06/02/2016

The Comedy of Consent: Shakespeare’s Dream of Politics

Date: 
April 7, 2016
Running Time: 
72:36

Joseph Loewenstein, Washington University professor and a specialist in Renaissance Literature and Culture, unearths the constitutional politics of Shakespearean comedy and considers Shakespeare’s meditation on publicness in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. He says, "For all their remarkable achievements in fine arts, literature, astronomy, philology, mathematics, and engineering, Renaissance Europeans had few successes as political theorists. Or so we are told. But if we look in odd places—in the comedies of Shakespeare, and in one or two of his tragedies—we may find that a few concepts crucial to modern political theory receive sustained attention. This lecture will consider two of them briefly, and one at length."  

 

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Last modified: 06/02/2016

Authors' Forum: The Reformation of Emotions in the Age of Shakespeare

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
April 6, 2016
Running Time: 
72:36

Steven Mullaney, U-M professor of English, talks about his recent book, The Reformation of Emotions in the Age of Shakespeare, with Douglas Trevor, U-M associate professor of Renaissance literature and creative writing. The crises of faith that fractured Reformation Europe also caused crises of individual and collective identity. Structures of feeling as well as structures of belief were transformed; there was a reformation of social emotions as well as a Reformation of faith. Mullaney shows that Elizabethan popular drama played a significant role in confronting the uncertainties and unresolved traumas of Elizabethan Protestant England. Shakespeare and his contemporaries—audiences as well as playwrights—reshaped popular drama into a new form of embodied social, critical, and affective thought. Examining a variety of works, from revenge plays to Shakespeare’s first history tetralogy and beyond, Mullaney explores how post-Reformation drama not only exposed these faultlines of society on stage but also provoked playgoers in the audience to acknowledge their shared differences. He demonstrates that our most lasting works of culture remain powerful largely because of their deep roots in the emotional landscape of their times.

 

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Last modified: 06/02/2016

Humanities Tools for Library Resources

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
April 4, 2016
Running Time: 
72:00

Hilde De Weerdt, Professor of Chinese History at Leiden University, reviews recent efforts to connect text databases, biographical databases, geographic information systems, and tools generated from within the humanities community. She argues that connecting databases and tools, open access as well as commercial, is an important mission for researchers and librarians in Chinese Studies and one that has been ignored for too long. De Weerdt says, "In the first part of the presentation I will briefly discuss the limitations of well-known textual databases in pre-twentieth century and modern Chinese Studies with regard to search functionality, data discovery, exportability, and accessibility. Next I will demonstrate how customized humanities tools can help overcome many of these limitations, using as an example the basic and new functionality of the MARKUS platform. I will conclude that the generation of humanities-specific platforms and tools is necessary for the development of Chinese Studies and compatible with the goals and premises of philological inquiry. I will also emphasize that the realization of resources and tools that conform with academic standards and research flows requires far more engagement from within the Chinese Studies community and closer collaboration between librarians, computer scientists, and humanities researchers and teachers."

 

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