Hatcher South

Radiation mapping is too important to be left to experts: the role of maps in Japan after March 11, 2011

Japan Radiation Map from GoogleEarth

Jean-Christophe Plantin talks about how traditional "critical cartography" assumes that maps can either serve the interests of those in power or empower those seeking social justice, and how this ambivalence in cartography is present in contemporary web-based mapping applications. Light refreshments.

Event Information

Date & Time
April 7, 2014 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm
Location
Hatcher Graduate Library, Instruction Space, Clark Library, 2nd Floor
Location Information
Event Type
Lecture

Curators' Tour of the Maps and Map Making in India Exhibit

Clark Library Indian Maps Exhibit
Clark Library Indian Maps Exhibit

Join Tim Utter, Manager of the Clark Library, and Jeff Martin, Librarian for South Asian Studies, for a curators' tour of the

Event Information

Date & Time
March 21, 2014 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Location
Clark Library, 2nd Floor Hatcher Library
Event Type
Talk

Third Thursday at the Clark Library: The U-M Himalayan Expedition, 1932-34

image of bookcover
Detail from bookcover of The Himalayan Journey of Walter N. Koelz, Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan

Carla Sinopoli, U-M professor of anthropology, as part of the LSA India in the World Theme Semester, shares tales from her recent book "The Himalayan Journey of Walter Normal Koelz: The University of Michigan Himalayan Expedition, 1932-34."

Event Information

Date & Time
March 20, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location
Hatcher Graduate Library, Clark Library, 2nd Floor
Location Information
Event Type
Lecture

Maps and Mapmaking in India: An Exhibit

Illustration for Maps and Mapmaking in India exhibit

The Stephen S. Clark Library’s map collection contains a rich variety of historical and modern maps and atlases of India. The exhibit, which runs through April 22, highlights many of our earliest maps, including a facsimile of an Arabic manuscript from 1159 C.E.

Event Information

Dates
January 16th through April 22nd
Today's Hours
8:00am to 11:45pm
Location
Clark Library, 2nd Floor Hatcher Library
Location Information
Event Type
Exhibit

Engaged Learning: Learning/Making/Doing

DMC Design Lab
DMC Design Lab http://www.dc.umich.edu/

The University Library's Engaged Learning Task Force will host the second in a series of panel discussions that explore ways the U-M community interprets, catalyzes, and participates in engaged learning.

Event Information

Date & Time
November 4, 2013 - 10:00am to 11:30am
Location
Clark Library, Clark Library Presentation Room
Location Information
Event Type
Panel Discussion

Exhibit: AfroKilt

AfroKilt explores the connections between Africa and Scotland through textiles – specifically, the role of Anchor thread, an embroidery thread with a unique versatility of color and texture. Anchor thread originates from Scotland’s oldest thread manufacturer J&P Coats and is found in contemporary Nigerian embroidered robes.

Event Information

Dates
October 18th, 2013 through December 22nd, 2013
Location
Clark Library
Location Information
Event Type
Exhibit

Ukrainian Society, Culture and Politics: A Conversation with the President and First Lady of Ukraine 2005-2010

The Orange Revolution

Join the President of Ukraine (2005-2010), Viktor Yushchenko, and First Lady Kateryna Yushchenko for a discussion about modern Ukrainian society - its people and their values - with emphasis on international cooperation in science, culture and education, and in particular the participation of Ukrainian int

Event Information

Date & Time
October 4, 2013 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Location
Clark Library, Seminar Room, Second Floor Hatcher Library
Location Information
Event Type
Discussion

Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive

Special Collections Library
Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library
913 S. University Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1190
(734) 764-9377 (p)

A collection of American culinary history: cookbooks and other materials from the 16th through the 20th century

We are not just what we eat, but how we eat — not to mention when, where and with whom. Cookbooks, menus, advertisements, manuals of table etiquette and the like may not be written to preserve the history of everyday life, but that’s exactly what they do.

And this is what makes the library’s Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive so valuable. Containing more than 15,000 items, it paints a rich and unique portrait of American life over the centuries.

“On one level, the collection is about what people cooked and ate — but that’s just a doorway to explore how people saw themselves and their neighbors,” says collection curator JJ Jacobson.

Through the culinary archive one can explore changing attitudes towards diet and health, homemaking, commercial dining and the industrialization of food production. It also reveals historical ideas about race, class, and gender.

“This is the kind of history that’s not concerned so much with empires, kings and battles, but with where the wheat comes from, how the bread is made, how different ethnic groups interact, and what culture tells women and men they should be like,” Jacobson adds.

And food continues to be an important part of our culture — contemporary discussions about organic produce, fast food, Atkins and other diet fads, concentrated feed lots, vending machines in schools and the merits of vegetarianism all stem from historical contexts chronicled in the archive.

The collection is shaped by the donation of a rich assemblage of cookbooks, menus, and other material collected over many years by Jan Longone, an adjunct curator in the U-M Special Collections Library, and her husband Dan.

Not so long ago, even the concept of American culinary history was met with skepticism.

“[Critics] said America had no cuisine or culinary history to speak of; all we ate were hamburgers,” Jan Longone wrote of attitudes at an Oxford University food symposium in the 1980s. Yet today the archive is recognized as a premier collection for the study of American culture as it relates to food and home life.

Writing in the Boston Globe, renowned chef James Beard called an exhibit of works from the collection “an unequaled feat of culinary scholarship.”

“Not all the cookbooks are good cookbooks, but they are all interesting and the authors, mainly women, were an amazing group who did a great deal to influence American history,” Beard wrote in the 1984 column.

And the collection has only continued to grow and evolve since then. Formerly held at U-M’s William L. Clements Library, it was transferred to the U-M Library in 2013 where its potential for teaching and scholarship can be fully realized.

Page maintained by JJ Jacobson
Last modified: 03/19/2014

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