American Culture

The First World War: Personal Experiences and Propaganda

Description

This database include a wide range of source material for the study of World War I, comprising personal narratives, printed books, military files, propaganda pamphlets, and visual materials. The database also includes interactive maps. The collections are organized into two modules, Personal Experiences and Propaganda and Recruitment.

Digitized materials include:

Diaries and journals
Letters
Personal narratives and reminiscences
Trench literature and soldiers’ journals
Postcards
Scrapbooks and albums
Photographs and 360° views of personal items and objects
Sketches and paintings
Ephemera
Sheet music
Photographs
War art
Cartoons and comics
Propaganda and recruiting posters
Extracts from local newspapers
Minute books
Papers of the Ministry of Information
Papers of the Kriegspresseamt
Tribunal case files
Instructions for the distribution of propaganda
Leaflets and Pamphlets
Trench maps

Type
Images
Text Collection
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/31228
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects
Questions about this resource? Contact Ask a Librarian

American Indian Histories and Culture

Description

According to the publisher's description:

The wide range of material included in American Indian Histories and Cultures presents a unique insight into interactions between American Indians and Europeans from their earliest contact, continuing through the turbulence of the American Civil War, the on-going repercussions of government legislation, right up to the civil rights movement of the mid- to late-twentieth century. This resource contains material from the Newberry Library’s extensive Edward E. Ayer Collection; one of the strongest archival collections on American Indian history in the world.

Document types, digitized in full colour, include:
-An extensive collection of manuscripts ranging from the early 16th to the mid-20th centuries
-A striking collection of artwork including rare American Indian ledger art
-Speeches and petitions written by American Indians
-Diaries, essays, travel journals and ledger books from early European expeditions
-Correspondence, notes and minutes relating to important treaties
-Early linguistic studies and ethnographic accounts of American Indian life
-Thousands of photographs
-Historic maps and atlases
-Rare printed books
-American Indian newspapers from the 1960s-1990s
 
This rich selection of primary sources covers such important themes as:
-American Indians and the European Powers
-American Indians and the US Government
-Military Encounters: Conflicts, Rebellions and Alliances
-Observation, Representation and Cultural Encounters
-Indigenous Peoples of Mexico
-First Nations of Canada
-Missionaries and Education
-Trade and Indian Economies
-Civil Rights Movement

Type
Text Collection
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/31226
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects
Questions about this resource? Contact Ask a Librarian

Ann Arbor Postcards

Alternative Titles
Making of Ann Arbor
Description

The Making of Ann Arbor is a public collection of resources on the history and development of the Ann Arbor community, created in collaboration with the Ann Arbor District Library, the Bentley Historical Library, and the University of Michigan's Digital Library Production Service. The Making of Ann Arbor Postcard collection is comprised of 260 online images.

Type
Images
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/30894
Access
Open access for all usersOpen access for all users
Subjects
Questions about this resource? Contact Ask a Librarian

American Jewess

Description

A digital reproduction of the 8 volumes of The American Jewess, the first English-language periodical targeted to American Jewish women, covering an evocative range of topics that ranged from women's place in the synagogue to whether women should ride bicycles.

Type
E-Journal(s)
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/30848
Access
Open access for all usersOpen access for all users
Subjects
Questions about this resource? Contact Ask a Librarian

Abraham Lincoln Association Serials

Alternative Titles
ALA Serials
Description

Between 1940 and 1952, the Abraham Lincoln Association published fifty-two issues of The Abraham Lincoln Quarterly, a journal with original articles regarding all facets of Abraham Lincoln's life and the world in which he lived. This database contains all of the issues of The Abraham Lincoln Quarterly.

Type
Database
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/30844
Access
Open access for all usersOpen access for all users
Subjects
Questions about this resource? Contact Ask a Librarian

The Women's Wear Daily Archive

Alternative Titles
WWD, Women's Wear Daily
Description

A comprehensive archive of Women’s Wear Daily, from the first issue in 1910 to material from within the last twelve months, reproduced in high-resolution images. Every page, article, advertisement and cover has been included, with searchable text and indexing. The Women’s Wear Daily Archive preserves one of the fashion industry's most prominent trade publications and influential reads. Key moments in the history of the industry, as well as major designers, brands, retailers and advertisers are all covered in this publication of record.

Type
Article Index
E-Journal(s)
Images
Coverage
1910 - within past 12 months
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/30749
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects
Questions about this resource? Contact Ask a Librarian

Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1880-1930

Alternative Titles
ProQuest History Vault, INS Records, History Vault Immigration
Description

Records of the INS, 1880-1930 presents the investigations made during the massive immigration wave at the turn of the 20th century. The files cover Asian immigration, especially Japanese and Chinese migration, to California, Hawaii, and other states; Mexican immigration to the U.S. from 1906-1930; and European immigration. There are also extensive files on the INS's regulation of prostitution and white slavery and on suppression of radical aliens. The collection is broken down as follows:

Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Series A: Subject Correspondence Files, Part 1: Asian Immigration and Exclusion, 1906-1913

Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Series A: Subject Correspondence Files, Part 1: Supplement: Asian Immigration and Exclusion, 1898-1941

Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Series A: Subject Correspondence Files, Part 2: Mexican Immigration, 1906-1930

Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Series A: Subject Correspondence Files, Part 3: Ellis Island, 1900-1933

Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Series A: Subject Correspondence Files, Part 4: European Investigations, 1898-1936
 
Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Series A: Subject Correspondence Files, Part 5: Prostitution and White Slavery, 1902-1933
 
Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Series A: Subject Correspondence Files, Part 6: Suppression of Aliens, 1906-1930
 
Voices from Ellis Island: An Oral History of American Immigration
 
 
Type
Text Collection
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/30747
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects
Questions about this resource? Contact Ask a Librarian

The Ojibwe People's Dictionary

Alternative Titles
Ojibwe Dictionary
Description

The Ojibwe People's Dictionary is a searchable Ojibwe-English dictionary that includes audio samples of native speakers of Ojibwe.  The dictionary includes images from collections of the Minnesota Historical Society.  Also includes excerpts from relevant documents in English and in Ojibwe.

Type
Dictionary
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/30535
Access
Open access for all usersOpen access for all users
Subjects
Questions about this resource? Contact Ask a Librarian

Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive

Special Collections Library
Hatcher Graduate Library
913 S. University Avenue
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1190
(734) 764-9377 (p)

A collection of American culinary history: cookbooks and other materials from the 16th through the 21st century

We are not just what we eat, but how we eat — not to mention when, where and with whom. Cookbooks, menus, advertisements, manuals of table etiquette and the like may not be written to preserve the history of everyday life, but that’s exactly what they do. And this is what makes the library’s Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive (JBLCA) so valuable. Containing more than 25,000 items including ephemera publications, it paints a rich and unique portrait of American life over the centuries. In the context of the collection, American culinary history is defined broadly to include both influences upon American foodways and the influence of American culinary practices elsewhere. 

Food preparation and consumption offers a doorway to explore how people saw themselves, their neighbors, and their larger communities. Through the culinary archive one can explore changing attitudes towards diet and health, homemaking, commercial dining and the industrialization of food production. It also reveals historical ideas about race, class, and gender. And food continues to be an important part of our culture — contemporary discussions about organic produce, fast food, dietetics and diet fads, concentrated feed lots, vending machines in schools and the merits of vegetarianism all stem from historical contexts chronicled in the archive.

The collection is shaped by the donation of a rich assemblage of cookbooks, menus, and other material collected over many years by Jan Longone, an adjunct curator in the U-M Special Collections Library, and her husband U-M Emeritus Professor Daniel T. Longone.

Not so long ago, even the concept of American culinary history was met with skepticism.

“[Critics] said America had no cuisine or culinary history to speak of; all we ate were hamburgers,” Jan Longone wrote of attitudes at an Oxford University food symposium in the 1980s. Yet today the archive is recognized as a premier collection for the study of American culture as it relates to food and home life.

Writing in the Boston Globe, renowned chef James Beard called an exhibit of works from the collection “an unequaled feat of culinary scholarship.”

“Not all the cookbooks are good cookbooks, but they are all interesting and the authors, mainly women, were an amazing group who did a great deal to influence American history,” Beard wrote in the 1984 column.

And the collection has only continued to grow and evolve since then. Formerly held at U-M’s William L. Clements Library, it was transferred to the U-M Library in 2013 where its potential for teaching and scholarship can be fully realized.

Page maintained by Juli McLoone
Last modified: 06/15/2016

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