History (General)

Brill's Medieval Reference Library Online

Description

3550 pages of text from 3 print Brill encyclopedias, complete and unabridged - Encyclopedia of Medieval Pilgrimage (2009) , Encyclopedia of the Medieval Chronicle (2010), Encyclopaedia of Medieval Dress and Textiles of the British Isles c. 450-1450 (2012) offering 3600 signed articles on aspects of medieval history, culture and belief, together with nearly 200 illustrations. Cross-searchable.

 

Type
Encyclopedia
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/29410
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

World Newsreels Online, 1929-1966

Description

The full run of newsreels on significant historical events from throughout the 20th century.  Includes the March of Time series, and selected videos from American History in Video and World History in Video, but adds new material from France, Japan, the Netherlands, and other countries throughout the world.

Each film has a transcript or translation. Clips and playlists can be created, saved and shared. Videos can be downloaded to an Apple OS or Android device, available for 48 hours. 

Type
Video
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/29351
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Twentieth Century Advice Literature

Alternative Titles
North American Guides on Race, Gender, Sex and the Family
20th C. Advice Literature
Description

"Twentieth Century Advice Literature: North American Guides on Race, Gender, Sex, and the Family allows students and researchers to immerse themselves in the values and behaviors of Americans of the past. The collection provides a window into American social history by bringing together the instructional, prescriptive, behavioral, and etiquette literature that defined standards of personal conduct for millions of Americans and reflected the prevailing social mores across the twentieth century. When complete, the collection will contain 150,000 pages of fully searchable handbooks, manuals, textbooks, etiquette guides, self-help books, instructional pamphlets, and how-to books that illustrate both how Americans actually behaved and how they felt they ought to behave."

Includes texts from over 700 sources.

 

 

Type
Text Collection
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/11815
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Afro-Americana Imprints, 1535-1922

Description

This collection is created from the Library Company of Philadelphia's acclaimed Afro-Americana Collection. When complete, this unique online resource will provide researchers with more than 12,000 printed works. These essential books, pamphlets and broadsides, including many lesser-known imprints, hold an unparalleled record of African American history, literature and culture. This collection spans nearly 400 years, from the early 16th to the early 20th century. Critically important subjects covered include the West's discovery and exploitation of Africa; the rise of slavery in the New World along with the growth and success of abolitionist movements; the development of racial thought and racism; descriptions of African American life -- slave and free -- throughout the Americas; and slavery and race in fiction and drama. Also featured are printed works of African American individuals and organizations. **At present, the online collection is only 8% complete.**

Can be cross-searched by keyword with African American Newspapers, African American Periodicals and other Archive of Americana series, using the Archive of Americana link below.

Type
Database
E-Book(s)
Text Collection
Coverage
1535-1922
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/11775
More Information
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Parker Library on the Web (Medieval Manuscripts)

Description

Parker Library on the Web is a digitized collection of Medieval manuscripts originally collected by Matthew Parker (1504-1575) and donated to Corpus Christi College Cambridge in 1574. Parker's collection is especially focused on materials relating to Anglo-Saxon England as he was interested in discovering evidence of an English-speaking church independent of Rome.

Type
Database
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/11773
More Information
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Atlanta Constitution 1868-1945

Alternative Titles
ProQuest Historical Newspapers
PQHN
Description

The Atlanta Constitution gives today’s researchers a vivid, first-hand account of one of the most turbulent periods in American history: post-Civil War reconstruction. This is an ideal primary resource for studying the feelings and reactions of Southerners on the passage of the 14th Amendment, the purging of “Rebels” from the legislature, the giving—then denying—of the right to vote to former slaves, and the passing of economic policies that changed the South and the United States forever.


This unique resource also captures the history of commercial giant Coca-Cola® in articles and display advertisements. It follows the development of baseball in America, including the Southern League’s Atlanta Crackers, sometimes called the “Yankees of the south” due to the team’s winning ways. The Atlanta Constitution also gives researchers the opportunity to read the original Uncle Remus stories that featured tricky Brer Rabbit and his foe, Brer Fox. Captured and written by Constitution journalist Joel Chandler Harris, these African folktales later inspired Walt Disney’s Song of the South and Warner Bros. cartoon character Bugs Bunny.

Type
Newspaper(s)
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/11697
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Lily

Description

Digital version, with both text and image files, of The Lily, the first newspaper for women, published from 1849 to 1856. Covers many topics important to women of the era, but especially temperance, child-bearing and education, and women’s rights.

The Lily was issued from 1849 until 1853 under the editorship of Amelia Bloomer (1818-1894).

Published in Seneca Falls, New York and priced at 50 cents a year, the newspaper began as a temperance journal for “home distribution” among members of the Seneca Falls Ladies Temperance Society, which had formed in 1848.

Bloomer felt that as women lecturers were considered unseemly, writing was the best way for women to work for reform. The paper encountered a number of early obstacles and the Society’s enthusiasm died out, but Bloomer felt a commitment to publish and assumed full responsibility for editing and publishing the paper.

Originally, the title page had the legend “Published by a committee of ladies”, but after 1850 only Bloomer’s name appeared on the masthead.

Although women’s exclusion from membership in temperance societies and other reform activities was the main force behind the initial publication of The Lily, it was not at first a radical paper, its editorial stance conforming to the emerging stereotype of women as “defenders of the home.”

In the first issue, Bloomer wrote: "It is woman that speaks through The Lily…Intemperance is the great foe to her peace and happiness. It is that above all that has made her Home desolate and beggared her offspring… Surely, she has the right to wield her pen for its Suppression. Surely, she may without throwing aside the modest refinements which so much become her sex, use her influence to lead her fellow mortals from the destroyer’s path."

The Lily always maintained its focus on temperance. Fillers often told horror stories about the effects of alcohol. For example, the May, 1849 issue noted, “A man when drunk fell into a kettle of boiling brine at Liverpool, Onondaga Co. and was scalded to death.” But gradually the newspaper began to include articles about other subjects of interest to women, many from the pen of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, writing under the pseudonym “sunflower.” Her earliest articles dealt with temperance, child-bearing and education, but she soon turned to the issue of women’s rights, writing about laws unfair to women and demanding change.

The circulation of The Lily rose from 500 per month to 4,000 per month because of the dress reform controversy. At the end of 1853, the Bloomers moved to Mount Vernon, Ohio, where Amelia Bloomer continued to edit The Lily, which by then had a national circulation of over 6,000. Bloomer sold The Lily in 1854 to Mary Birdsall because she and her husband, Dexter were moving to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where no facilities for publishing the paper were available. She remained a contributing editor for the two years The Lily survived after she sold it. The Lily published its final issue December 15, 1856.

Type
E-Journal(s)
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/11693
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Archives Unbound

Description

Archives Unbound presents topically-focused digital collections of historical documents. Collections in Archives Unbound cover a broad range of topics from the middle ages forward- from Witchcraft to World War II to twentieth century political history. Collections can be cross-searched or searched individually. For a complete list of available collections, see: http://go.galegroup.com/gdsc/i.do?v=2.1&u=umuser&pg=collections&it=browsecollections&p=GDSC&sw=null

Type
Subject Gateway
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/11635
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

English Heritage Archives

Description

Database of over one million catalogue entries describing photographs, plans, and drawings of England's buildings and historic sites.

Database includes:

  • photographs from the earliest days of photography to the present day illustrating domestic, public and industrial buildings

  • detailed drawings and reports on buildings of interest because of their style or function

  • surveys of archaeological sites, such as Roman forts and medieval villages, which may survive only as earthworks or marks in vegetation

You can search the catalogue without registering, but you’ll need to register for a Heritage Passport to place an order, save records as Favourites and save your searches.  Registration is free.

Type
Database
Images
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/11627
Access
Open access for all usersOpen access for all users
Subjects

The March of Time

Alternative Titles
March of Time
Description

The March of Time first aired in March 1931 as a CBS radio series, in which the news of the day was dramatized using professional actors. In 1935 it was adapted for motion picture production and through its final airing in 1951 was one of the most notable newsreel and television series of the early 20th Century. A cross between confrontational journalism and docudrama, The March of Time series was provocative, amusing and sometimes outrageous. The 1938 release of "Inside Nazi Germany" was one of the most controversial films ever shown in American theaters.

The most unusual feature of the films was the re-creation or staging of events that had taken place, but had not been photographed by newsreel cameras. The producers argued that they had the same right to clarify news events with staged scenes as a re-write man on a newspaper had with words to make sense out of a reporter's notes. They used professional and amateur actors to impersonate famous people on the screen and then blended the staged scenes with newsreel footage.

The films were digitally re-mastered by HBO Archives.

Type
Video
Coverage
Covers events from 1912-1966.
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/11619
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Pages

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