Health Sciences

Sociological Abstracts

Alternative Titles
Soc Abs, Soc Abstracts
Sociologicalabstracts
SocioFile, Socio File
ProQuest Sociological Abstracts
Description

Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800 serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers. Many records from key journals in sociology, added to the database since 2002, also include the references cited in the bibliography of the source article.

Each individual reference may also have links to an abstract and/or to other papers that cite that reference; these links increase the possibility of finding more potentially relevant articles. These references are linked both within Sociological Abstracts and across other social science databases available on ProQuest.

Updated monthly, with approximately 30,000 records added per year. (Description from the publisher's website.)

Type
Article Index
Coverage
1952-
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/8199
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

ArticleFirst

Description

Brief citations of articles from tables of contents of over 12,000 journals in science, technology, medicine, social science, business, the humanities, and popular culture. Updated daily.

Type
Article Index
Coverage
1990 -
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/8181
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

AGRICOLA

Alternative Titles
AGRICOLA (CSA)
Description

A bibliographic database of the agricultural literature, containing records of materials acquired by the National Agriculture Library (NAL) and cooperating institutions. Index to articles in agriculture, soil sciences, forestry, and related areas.

Type
Article Index
Coverage
1970 -
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/8183
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Mergent WebReports

Description
Mergent WebReports is an online database of 180,000 corporate and industry related documents, including analyst equity reports on over 4,000 large and mid-cap US companies; annual reports, prospectuses, financial statements, and annual summaries on over 30,000 companies worldwide; and in-depth analyses of key industries in North America, Europe, and Asia/Pacific, which describe the market environment, industry landscape and key market trends for companies, industries, countries and regions. Industries include automotive, banking, insurance, oil and gas, information technology.
Type
Database
Stable URL
http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/8149
Access
Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)Authorized UM users (+ guests in UM Libraries)
Subjects

Dentistry program expenses in 1900

The following description of the Dentistry Program is taken from the School of Dentistry's "Announcement" of 1900-1901, pp. 26-28.  Incoming students were informed of the expenses they could expect to incur during their course of study.

FEES AND EXPENSES

MATRICULATION FEE.—For Michigan students, ten dollars; for all others, twenty-five dollars.

ANNUAL FEE.—For Michigan students, thirty-five dollars; for all others, forty-five dollars.

DIPLOMA FEE.—For all alike, ten dollars.

LABORATORY EXPENSES.—Chemical Laboratory.—Students are required to pay for the materials and apparatus consumed by them. The average expense for the required course is about ten dollars. Histological Laboratory.—A charge of seven dollars is made for materials used in this laboratory. Anatomical Laboratory.—A charge of ten dollars is made for materials used in dissection. A fee of three dollars is charged to cover the expense of gas, plaster of paris, wear and tear of laboratory supplies, and clinical facilities each year.

The following table will indicate the necessary expenses of a student, who is not a resident of Michigan, for each year. The expense to residents of Michigan will be $25 less the first year and $10 less for each subsequent year. To determine the total expense of any year, it will only be necessary to add the usual expenses of living for forty weeks, and including traveling expenses, charities, pleasures, etc. Board in Ann Arbor is to be had at all prices, from $3 per week up. The average for respectable board, room and washing will vary from $4 to $6. The instruments, tools and books in this table should not be considered college expenses, as they are unperishable and necessary for practice after graduating.

Freshman Year
Tuition Fees ($25.00, matriculation; $45.00, annual) $70.00
Dental Laboratory Fee $3.00
Dental Laboratory tools $50.00
Books $20.00
Material used in Dental Laboratory $7.00
$150.00

Junior Year

Tuition Fee (annual). $45.00
Dissecting Ticket $10.00
Chemical Laboratory Ticket $10.00
Histological Laboratory $7.00
Dental Laboratory $3.00
Books $20.00
Tools and materials used in Dental Laboratory $5.00
$100.00

Senior Year

Tuition Fee (annual) $45.00
Laboratory and Clinical Room Fee $3.00
Diploma Fee $10.00
Instruments for Operating $125.00
Books $12.00
$195.00

TOTAL EXPENSES.—The average total expenses of a student of Dentistry including University fees, board, books, etc., are from three hundred dollars and upward for the college year of nine months, depending on the habits and tastes of individuals. The costs of instruments and tools necessary for the entire course of three years will be about one hundred and fifty dollars. By distinguishing this amount over three years fifty dollars will be added to this estimate for each year, but this cannot be properly considered a college expense, as the tools are not perishable and are necessary for practice.

To avoid embarrassment, freshmen students, not residents of Michigan, MUST come prepared to spend during the first week for college, fees, books, and tools, $150; Michigan students will require $125. In addition, at least the first month’s board should be provided, estimated at from four to six dollars per week. Traveling and incidental expenses should not be included in the above.

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Dentistry facilities in 1900

The following description of the Dentistry Program is taken from the School of Dentistry's "Announcement" of 1900-1901, pp. 20-21.  This document describes the library and museum facilities which distinguished the University of Michigan. (See photo of the library reading room at this time)

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION

Among the facilities of special interest to students of dentistry the following may be mentioned:

DENTAL MUSEUM

The Dental Museum is supplied with a large number of anatomical, physiological, pathological, and histological preparations, including a series illustrating dentition from infancy to the completion of the process in the adult, and the normal changes through life to old age, and also illustrative of the dental and osseous tissues. Preparations, natural and artificial, greatly facilitate the study of the nervous and vascular systems. The design is to make every practicable appliance in this direction available.

The museum has been enriched by the generosity of Professor C.L. Ford, who contributed his entire collection of crania and ondontological specimens, making it perhaps the best of its kind in this country.

DENTAL LIBRARY

The library of dental science, containing almost every known work on this specialty, including a nearly complete file of every Dental Journal published , is shelved in the dental building, where it is accessible to all students. A finely appointed reading room is an important feature connected with the library. Twenty-four dental journals are regularly received.

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Dentistry admission requirements in 1900

The following description of the Dentistry Program is taken from the School of Dentistry's "Announcement" of 1900-1901, pp. 8-9.  This document describes the procedures and the content of the examination for admission

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION.
Applicants for admission must be at least eighteen years of age and present to the Faculty satisfactory evidence of a good moral character; this should be in the form of a letter from a reputable dental or medical practitioner in the place from which the applicant comes.
Matriculates in the other scientific departments of the University, and graduates of recognized colleges, academies, or high schools, are admitted without further examination on presentation of proper diploma or certificate. Commercial and English diplomas will only be credited so far as they include the studies indicated in the scheme for examination as printed below. Candidates are requested to bring or send to the Secretary a letter from the superintendent of the school from which the diploma was obtained naming the subjects studied for the degree, with credit marked on each study, (use insert, next page).
All other applicants are examined as to their previous education and their fitness to enter on the technical study of dentistry. The subjects on which examination are held for the session beginning September, 1900, are as follows:
1. English. – An Essay of not less than one page (foolscap), correct in spelling, punctuation, capital letters, grammar, sentential structure and paragraphing.
2. History. – Meyer’s General History, or an equivalent, and Higginson’s or Johnson’s History of the United States.
3. Mathematics.Arithmetic. – Fundamental Rules, Fractions (common and decimal), Denominate Numbers, Percentage, Proportion, Involution and Evolution; and the Metric System of Weights and Measures. Algebra. – Fundamental Rules, Fractions, Equations of the First Degree, containing two or more unknown quantities. Geometry. – Plane Geometry.
4. Physics. – An amount represented by Avery’s Natural Philosophy, or Carhart and Chute’s Elements of Physics.
5. Latin. – Jones’s First Latin Book, or Harkness’s Latin Reader, or an equivalent amount in any other text-book.
6. Botany, Zoology, Physical Geography, and Physiology. – The applicant must offer two of these subjects. The requirements in each subject are as follows:
Botany. – The elements of Vegetable Morphology and Physiology as given in Spalding’s Introduction to Botany.
Zoology. – Packard’s Zoology, briefer course.
Physical Geography. – Tarr’s Elementary Physical Geography, especially chapters 9 to 21, inclusive, or an equivalent.
Physiology. – The Human Body – Martin’s.
Entrance examinations will be held in Ann Arbor, beginning at 9 A.M., September 24, 1900. To provide for cases in which it is impossible for the applicant to be present on this date, other examinations will be set for such times as may be determined by the Faculty.

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Dentistry curriculum in 1900 (4-year program)

The following description of the Dentistry Program is taken from the School of Dentistry's "Announcement" of 1900-1901, pp. 9-10.  This four-year program had just been designed as an alternative to the standard three-year program.

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
The Board of Regents at a meeting held May 17, 1900, authorized the Dental Faculty to provide a curriculum for a four years’ course in Dentistry in place of the present three years’ course, to be inaugurated with the session beginning in 1901, and also, at the same time, to make the educational requirements for admission to the Dental Course; a diploma from an accredited High School or other school of similar standing; or the equivalent of either in examination.
The following arrangement of the curriculum for the four years course will outline, as far as it is practicable to do so at the present time, the order and scope of work to be covered by the course. For the first year the fundamental studies will be pursued entirely, to the exclusion of technical subjects.
FIRST YEAR.
Subjects Hours
Lecture course in General Osteology and Anatomy, 100
Lecture course in General Inorganic Chemistry, 85
Lecture course in Organic Chemistry, 51
Lecture course in Embryology and Histology, 100
The following laboratory courses of nine weeks each, or 180 actual hours for each course, will accompany and supplement the lecture courses: Dissection, Qualitative Chemistry, and Histology.

SECOND YEAR

Subject Hours
Lecture course in Bacteriology, 85
Laboratory course in Bacteriology, 180
Lecture course in Physiology, 136
Lecture course in General and Electrical Physics, 100
Demonstration course in Prosthetic Technics, 100
Laboratory work in Prosthetic Technics, 600

THIRD YEAR

Subject Hours
Lecture course in Dental Materia Medica, 70
Lecture course in Dental Operative Principles, 34
Lecture course in Dental Anatomy and Operative Technics, 50
Laboratory course in Dental Anatomy and Operative Technics, 180
Lecture course in General and Histological Pathology, 50
Laboratory course in Histological Pathology, 180
Lecture course in Regional Anatomy and Surgical Principles, 34
Laboratory course in Regional Anatomy and Operative Surgery, 180
Lecture course in Dental Metallurgy, 34
Laboratory course in Dental Metallurgy,          180
Lecture course in Orthodontia, 34
Laboratory course in Orthodontia Technics, 180

FOURTH YEAR

Subject Hours
Lecture course in Operative Dentistry, 34
Clinical course in Operative Dentistry, 500
Lecture course in Prosthetic Dentistry, 34
Clinical course in Prosthetic Dentistry, 300
Clinical lecture course in Oral Surgery, 68
Lecture course in Dental Pathology and Surgery,         75
Lecture course in Dental Therapeutics, 34

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Dentistry curriculum in 1900

The following description of the Dentistry Program is taken from the School of Dentistry's "Announcement" of 1900-1901, pp. 12-14.  This program was designed to take three years of study, but a new four-year program was announced that same year. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION

In the arrangement of the course of study it is the aim to make it such as will meet the requirements of the student and the expectation of the profession, and secure the greatest benefit to the public. To accomplish these objects and to accommodate and benefit those students who desire a thorough dental education, the course of instruction is made to cover three college years of nine months each. The course thus affords time for the teaching and study of subjects not generally taught; and especially does it give time for thorough work in the laboratories. In the arrangement of the work a graded course of study is combined with the repetition of such lecturers only as will avoid the confusion incident to the presentation of too many parts of the general subject to the mind of the student, at one time. No subject is dismissed before its relations to other parts can be seen and appreciated.

FIRST YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

Subject

Hours
Osteology and Anatomy (Yutzy), three lectures per week, 51
General Chemistry (Lichty), five lectures per week, 85
Prosthetic Dentistry (Dorrance), one lecture per week, 17
Dental Laboratory Work (Hoff), three demonstrations and 25 hours of laboratory practice per week, 425

SECOND SEMESTER

Subject

Hours
Organic Chemistry (Gomberg), four lectures per week, 68
Descriptive anatomy (Yutzy), threelectures per week, 51
Histology (lectures) (Huber), four lecture per week, 68
Prosthetic Dentistry (Dorrance), one lecture per week, 17
Dental Laboratory Work (Hoff), three demonstrations and 25 hours of laboratory practice per week, 425

SECOND YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

Subject

Hours
Physiology (Lombard), five lectures per week, 85
Bacteriology (Novy), four lectures per week, 68
Prosthetic Dentistry (Dorrance), one lecture per week, 17
Operative Principles and Materials (Taft), one lecture per week, 17

SECOND SEMESTER

Subject

Hours
Dental and Comparative Anatomy (Hall), threelectures per week, 51
Physiology (Lombard), fivelectures per week, 85
Prosthetic Dentistry (Dorrance), one lecture per week, 17
Operative Principles and Materials (Taft), one lecture per week, 17

The following subjects are also included in the work of the second year, making a continuous course of laboratory instruction running through the year. The time for each course must be elected at the beginning of the session, preference being allowed in the order of registration. Every afternoon during the year is fully occupied by some one of these courses:

Subject

Hours
Regulating and Porcelain Techniques (Hoff), 120
Dissection (Yutzy), 120
Histological Laboratory (Huber), 120
Qualitative Chemistry (Hall), 120

THIRD YEAR

These courses extend through the entire year.

Subject

Hours
Dental Surgery and Pathology (Taft), three hours per week, 75
Dental Medicine (Hoff), three hours per week, 75
*Oral Surgery (Darling), two hours per week, 68
Orthodontia and Oral Deformities (Dorrance), one hour per week, 34
Operative Dentistry (Watling), one hour per week, 34
Prosthetic Clinic (Dorrance), ten hours per week, 340
Operative Clinic (Watling, Hall), twenty hours per week, 680

All students of the first and second years are obliged to stand examination on the required branches of their respective courses, before leaving the college at the end of the term. These examinations are held at the close of each semester, and no student who has failed to pass two of the required branches in his course, is admitted to an advanced class during the first semester of the following year. All conditions must be removed during the semester following the one in which they were received.

__________________________________________________________
*An optional Laboratory Course in Oral Surgery, including demonstrations on the cadaver will be given this year.


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