University Library Emergent Research Series

Please join us on the 4th Monday of each month, from 10:00-11:30am in the Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery (except where otherwise listed) for programs that address the research lifecycle. These events are aimed at better understanding the various types of research undertaken across campus, particularly as they relate to library services and support, opportunities for collaboration, data management and preservation, and beyond. This page is a list of past and upcoming events put on by the library about the entire research process. We will also post information about other relevant events.

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Twitter account: @UMLibRes
Events hashtag: #MLibRes

Jump to Past Events this calendar year


2014 Emergent Research Series Events (with links to recordings of events)
2013 Emergent Research Series Events (with links to recordings of events)


Upcoming Events

Charles F. Burant, Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Professor of Metabolism, Professor of Internal Medicine, Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Monday, April 27, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

Photo of Charles BurantCharles F. Burant, M.D., Ph.D. is the Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Professor of Metabolism. Dr. Burant received his bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin and his graduate and medical degrees from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Dr. Burant's clinical interests are in the area of metabolic syndromes and management of Type II Diabetes. His research laboratory investigates the mechanisms of insulin resistance and utilizes animal models of diabetes to identify pathways important in understanding diabetes progression. Additionally, his lab also studies adult pancreatic progenitor cells and how they might be used to generate new insulin secreting beta-cells.


Photo of Julie HerradaJulie Herrada, Curator of the Joseph A. Labadie Collection, Special Collections Library
Monday, May 18, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

More information coming soon!


Publishing and the Public Library

Drawing of Eli NeiburgerEli Neiburger, Deputy Director at the Ann Arbor District Library (AADL)
June 22, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

Find out what AADL has been doing to adapt to the changing media landscape, including direct licensing, content production, and community partnerships.

Eli Neiburger is Deputy Director at the Ann Arbor District Library.  He graduated from the UM College of Architecure & Urban Planning in 1996, and joined the staff of the AADL in 1997 as a helpdesk technician. He is the author of Gamers... in the LIBRARY?! Published by ALA Editions in 2007, and has contributed to BOOK: A Manifesto and Carnegie Mellon's Well Played, a peer-reviewed journal of game criticism.
 


Past Events

Archiving the Digital Ephemeral: Social Movements, Community Groups, Artists, and Web-based Content

Howard Besser, Director of Moving Image Archiving & Preservation at New York University and Professor Emeritus of Information Studies at UCLA
Monday, April 6, 2015 (Note special date!) from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Storify (Special thanks to Patricia Anderson for creating.)

Ephemeral content such as flyers, leaflets, artist drafts, schedules, and photographs lies at the heart of how scholars have studied social movements, community groups, and artists. Today that material resides on the Web and on social networks, making more of it more widely accessible, but usually only for a very short period of time. Both our Special Collections and our discipline-based selectors need to be gathering and archiving this type of material before it disappears.

Photo of Howard BesserIn this talk, Howard Besser will discuss issues and challenges around archiving this type of content. He will discuss the experience of Activist Archivists (AA) in engaging both librarians and the Occupy Movement to be more involved in making material more preservable and discoverable, as well as methods that AA developed for dealing with the vast scale of hundreds of thousands of items. And he will discuss a new Mellon-funded project to extend web archiving to encompass streaming media and capture the works of budding composers. He will also discuss current experiments pairing students learning web archiving with archivists and librarians trying to preserve the content of ethnic community websites.

He has given talks and written extensively about copyright, and is a co-author of "The Digital Dilemma", the National Research Council's study of the implications of information age technology on intellectual property.  Other articles by Besser include "Intellectual Property: The Attack on Public Space in Cyberspace".  He was also a co-founder of ALA's "Information Commons" Initiative Group, which focused on how intellectual property laws impeded the building of a true "commons" of information. He recently taught a course on "Free Culture and Open Access".


Research with Material Objects

Panel: Katie Lennard, Tim Utter, Daniel Fisher
Monday, February 23, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Watch recording

This cross-disciplinary panel will discuss trends, issues, and challenges of doing research with material culture and material objects. Panelists will also address the role of technology in facilitating their research process.

Photo of Katie LennardKatie Lennard, PhD Candidate, Department of American Culture
Archaeologists have long used artifacts to better understand life in ancient civilizations, but how can historians of the 19th and 20th century US use material goods to gain a new perspective on the more recent past? Katie's dissertation Made in America: Costume, Ritual, and the Ku Klux Klan 1905-1940 tracks the industrial production and national distribution of Ku Klux Klan robes in the early 20th century. This work draws significantly on data from examinations of extant Klan robes held in museum collections, but also relies on more traditional archival research to contextualize these artifacts. Katie's presentation will consider the value of material culture for historians, while also discussing what kind of information artifacts, particularly mass-produced goods, cannot provide. 

Photo of Tim UtterTim Utter, Manager of the Clark Library
Tim Utter is a Map Librarian and Manager of the Clark Library.  Tim is very interested in how the variety of ways of seeing and representing place on maps affects our worldview, our shared experience as viewers, the map's story - its history and what it communicates to us, as well as map as cultural beacon. His research interests include Dutch maps of the 16th-17th centuries and pictorial maps.

 

Photo of Daniel FisherDaniel Fisher, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Earth and Environmental Sciences, Claude W. Hibbard Collegiate Professor of Paleontology, Curator and Director, Museum of Paleontology
Professor Fisher's current research focuses on the paleobiology and extinction of mastodons and mammoths, elucidated by studies of growth increments and compositional time series (isotopic and elemental) sampled from their tusks and cheek teeth. Professor Fisher’s work on individual specimens and sites often involves construction of 3D models. While he typically works with these using specialized graphics software, he and his students are beginning to use formats that permit more general access, such as a "3D pdf." Another of Professor Fisher's research projects focuses on the baby woolly mammoth named Lyuba. At a recent annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, he and his colleagues (Shirley et al. 2011) presented results derived from CT scans of this specimen, some of which were used to create animations such as this: Lyuba CT Scan.


Systematic Reviews

Mark MacEachern and Whitney Townsend, Informationists at Taubman Health Sciences Library
Monday, January 26, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Storify (Special thanks to Patricia Anderson for creating.)
Watch recording

A systematic review is a type of research publication that has become an integral part of the health sciences and other fields. As a publication that relies heavily on literature searches, systematic reviews provide information professionals with an opportunity to significantly contribute to and impact the resulting research. Informationists Mark MacEachern and Whitney Townsend will give an overview of this publication type and discuss appropriate literature search methodologies, while also describing their experiences working on these project teams and teaching a grant-supported CE workshop for librarians on the topic. A special focus will be placed on the flow and management of information through the systematic review process, and on the role of librarians in the identification, production, and assessment of these research publications.

Photo of Mark MacEachern

Mark MacEachern is an informationist in the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor. In this role, he works closely with faculty and students throughout the University of Michigan Health System and other relevant units on education and research projects. Mark is heavily involved in the evidence-based practice components of the medical, pharmacy, and dental curricula, and regularly teaches systematic review content to residents, fellows, and research faculty. He has extensive experience consulting and partnering on systematic review projects and was part of team recently awarded funding to develop a – National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region (GMR)–funded systematic review workshop designed to empower information professionals with strategies to participate in systematic review initiatives in their environment. 

Photo of Whitney TownsendWhitney A. Townsend is an informationist and coordinator of the Health Sciences Executive Research Service in the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor. She partners with the faculty and staff of numerous clinical departments of the University of Michigan Health System to best address information needs related to their clinical, research, and academic missions. Townsend is deeply embedded in curriculum-integrated instruction in the medical school and is actively involved in integrating information skills components into the school’s current curriculum reform. Townsend has been a member of numerous systematic review teams; teaches a session on systematic review appraisal for third-year medical students; instructs on systematic review searching and information management for residents, fellows, and faculty; and is an instructor for a GMR-funded systematic review workshop.

Page maintained by Sara M. Samuel
Last modified: 04/09/2015