University Library Emergent Research Series

Please join us on the 4th Monday of each month, from 10:00-11:30am in the Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery (except where otherwise listed) for programs that address the research lifecycle. These events are aimed at better understanding the various types of research undertaken across campus, particularly as they relate to library services and support, opportunities for collaboration, data management and preservation, and beyond. This page is a list of past and upcoming events put on by the library about the entire research process. We will also post information about other relevant events.

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Twitter account: @UMLibRes
Events hashtag: #MLibRes

Jump to Past Events this calendar year

2013 Emergent Research Series Events (with links to recordings of events)


Upcoming Events

March - No event


Howard Besser
Monday, April 6, 2015 (
Note special date!) from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

More information coming soon!


Charles F. Burant, Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Professor of Metabolism, Professor of Internal Medicine, Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Monday, April 27, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

More information coming soon!


Julie Herrada, Curator of the Joseph A. Labadie Collection, Special Collections Library
Monday, May 18, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

More information coming soon!


Past Events

Research with Material Objects

Panel: Katie Lennard, Tim Utter, Daniel Fisher
Monday, February 23, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

This cross-disciplinary panel will discuss trends, issues, and challenges of doing research with material culture and material objects. Panelists will also address the role of technology in facilitating their research process.

Photo of Katie LennardKatie Lennard, PhD Candidate, Department of American Culture
Archaeologists have long used artifacts to better understand life in ancient civilizations, but how can historians of the 19th and 20th century US use material goods to gain a new perspective on the more recent past? Katie's dissertation Made in America: Costume, Ritual, and the Ku Klux Klan 1905-1940 tracks the industrial production and national distribution of Ku Klux Klan robes in the early 20th century. This work draws significantly on data from examinations of extant Klan robes held in museum collections, but also relies on more traditional archival research to contextualize these artifacts. Katie's presentation will consider the value of material culture for historians, while also discussing what kind of information artifacts, particularly mass-produced goods, cannot provide. 

Photo of Tim UtterTim Utter, Manager of the Clark Library
Tim Utter is a Map Librarian and Manager of the Clark Library.  Tim is very interested in how the variety of ways of seeing and representing place on maps affects our worldview, our shared experience as viewers, the map's story - its history and what it communicates to us, as well as map as cultural beacon. His research interests include Dutch maps of the 16th-17th centuries and pictorial maps.

 

Photo of Daniel FisherDaniel Fisher, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Earth and Environmental Sciences, Claude W. Hibbard Collegiate Professor of Paleontology, Curator and Director, Museum of Paleontology
Professor Fisher's current research focuses on the paleobiology and extinction of mastodons and mammoths, elucidated by studies of growth increments and compositional time series (isotopic and elemental) sampled from their tusks and cheek teeth. Professor Fisher’s work on individual specimens and sites often involves construction of 3D models. While he typically works with these using specialized graphics software, he and his students are beginning to use formats that permit more general access, such as a "3D pdf." Another of Professor Fisher's research projects focuses on the baby woolly mammoth named Lyuba. At a recent annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, he and his colleagues (Shirley et al. 2011) presented results derived from CT scans of this specimen, some of which were used to create animations such as this: Lyuba CT Scan.


Systematic Reviews

Mark MacEachern and Whitney Townsend, Informationists at Taubman Health Sciences Library
Monday, January 26, 2015 from 10:00 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Storify (Special thanks to Patricia Anderson for creating.)
Watch recording

A systematic review is a type of research publication that has become an integral part of the health sciences and other fields. As a publication that relies heavily on literature searches, systematic reviews provide information professionals with an opportunity to significantly contribute to and impact the resulting research. Informationists Mark MacEachern and Whitney Townsend will give an overview of this publication type and discuss appropriate literature search methodologies, while also describing their experiences working on these project teams and teaching a grant-supported CE workshop for librarians on the topic. A special focus will be placed on the flow and management of information through the systematic review process, and on the role of librarians in the identification, production, and assessment of these research publications.

Photo of Mark MacEachern

Mark MacEachern is an informationist in the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor. In this role, he works closely with faculty and students throughout the University of Michigan Health System and other relevant units on education and research projects. Mark is heavily involved in the evidence-based practice components of the medical, pharmacy, and dental curricula, and regularly teaches systematic review content to residents, fellows, and research faculty. He has extensive experience consulting and partnering on systematic review projects and was part of team recently awarded funding to develop a – National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region (GMR)–funded systematic review workshop designed to empower information professionals with strategies to participate in systematic review initiatives in their environment. 

Photo of Whitney TownsendWhitney A. Townsend is an informationist and coordinator of the Health Sciences Executive Research Service in the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor. She partners with the faculty and staff of numerous clinical departments of the University of Michigan Health System to best address information needs related to their clinical, research, and academic missions. Townsend is deeply embedded in curriculum-integrated instruction in the medical school and is actively involved in integrating information skills components into the school’s current curriculum reform. Townsend has been a member of numerous systematic review teams; teaches a session on systematic review appraisal for third-year medical students; instructs on systematic review searching and information management for residents, fellows, and faculty; and is an instructor for a GMR-funded systematic review workshop.


December - No event


The Future of Social Science Research: Panel

Panel of U-M faculy
Monday, November 24, 2014 from 10-11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Watch recording

Photo of Nick Ellis

Photo of Michelle McClellanPhoto of George AlterThe ways in which social scientists conduct, discuss, and share research is changing. Among other things, social science research is increasingly more interdisciplinary and team-based, more global, and more data-driven. Panelists will offer their perspectives on the future of social science research, with attention to historical and emerging trends. Panelists include:

 

  • Nick Ellis, Professor of Psychology and Linguistics
  • Michelle McClellan, Assistant Professor in the Department of History and the Residential College
  • George Alter, Director of the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), Professor of History, Research Professor in the U-M Population Studies Center


The Future of Social Science Research

Photo of Brian NosekBrian Nosek, Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia
Monday, November 17, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Watch recording

The ways in which social scientists conduct, discuss, and share research is changing. Among other things, social science research is increasingly more interdisciplinary and team-based, more global, and more data-driven. Cognitive Psychologist Brian Nosek, University of Virginia, will discuss his perspectives on the future of social science research, with attention to his experiences working within his discipline, as well as his work with the Center for Open ScienceProject Implicit, and the Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences (BITSS).


Girls in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (gEECS)

gEECS Members
Monday, October 27, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Storify (Special thanks to Patricia Anderson for creating.)
Watch recording

Logo of Girls in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

The Girls in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science student group (gEECS) is dedicated to encouraging the professional, academic, and social development of women in technology-related fields of study. Members of the gEECS group will share their thoughts on how the group supports the research and education of women here at U-M and some benefits they experience by participating in gEECS. They will also share their thoughts on how gender affects research and education, specifically in technology areas.


Games for Research and Education

Michelle Meade, David Chesney, and David Carter
Monday, September 22, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Storify (Special thanks to Patricia Anderson for creating.)
Watch recording

Photos of Michelle, David, and DavidMost know video games for their role in entertainment, or through recent trends of "gamification" by courses, researchers, and businesses; however, video games in the traditional sense has seen tremendous growth and sophistication as a medium for researchers and educators to reach challenging demographics, serve as a tool for behavioral intervention, or generally provide a platform for computer scientists, artists, UX designers, and musicians to develop compelling interactive experiences. 
 
We hope you'll join our panel of speakers as they dive into the various ways researchers, educators, and librarians are using video games to not only entertain but transform the user's experience into something more meaningful. Michelle Meade will talk about her work using custom mobile games as a tool for behavioral change among those with Spinal Cord Injury, David Chesney will share experiences developing transformative games in his innovative computer science course, and David Carter will cover library collections around games such as the Video Game Archive, resources on campus, and emerging trends.

Maker Spaces: Panel

Rebecca Price, Architecture, Urban Planning, and Visual Resources Librarian
Linda Knox, Learning Design Librarian
Emily Puckett Rodgers, Special Projects Librarian
Monday, August 25, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Watch recording

Picture of Rebecca PricePicture of Linda KnoxPicture of Emily Puckett RodgersMaker spaces offer artists, designers, engineers and entrepreneurs access to tools, software, space and expertise that enable them to fabricate and test out ideas and create new projects. This panel will explore the ways in which the University Library and the Ann Arbor community maker spaces are serving the local DIY culture. Rebecca Price and Linda Knox will talk about the maker spaces on north campus and Emily Puckett Rodgers will talk about the Ann Arbor maker community and the Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire.


Data Visualization in the Library

Photo of Justin JoqueJustin Joque, Visualization Librarian
Monday, July 28, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Watch recording

Data visualization has become an increasingly important part of working with research data. While universities, libraries and data providers are investing in data and visualization infrastructure, the term now encompass a broadening range of activities from the design of graphics for publication to real time rendering of terabytes of data in interactive 3D environments. This talk will explore the landscape of research data visualization and the role the library can play in supporting visualization across campus.


Summer Brownbag Series "I do not think it means what you think it means"

We will have informal conversations centered around a term that is relevant to emergent research practices and/or central to research library activities and services, but often means different things to different people. Feel free to bring your lunch and join the conversation!

  • Holdings
    Tuesday, July 29, 2014
    12:00 - 1:00 PM
    Turkish-American Friendship Room, 4004 Shapiro
  • Map
    Thursday, May 22, 2014
    12:00 - 1:00 PM
    Turkish-American Friendship Room, 4004 Shapiro
  • Publish
    Thursday, June 19, 2014
    12:00 - 1:00 PM
    Turkish-American Friendship Room, 4004 Shapiro
  • Informationist
    Monday, July 14, 2014
    12:00 - 1:00 PM
    Turkish-American Friendship Room, 4004 Shapiro

SEAD: Sustainable Environment through Actionable Data

Photo of Dr. HedstromMargaret Hedstrom, Professor of Information, School of Information and Faculty Associate, Institute for Social Research
Monday, June 23, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery Lab

Margaret Hedstrom will be speaking about the Sustainable Environment through Actionable Data project (SEAD). SEAD provides lightweight data services specifically designed to support multi-disciplinary research and to meet the needs of small-team and single investigator projects. SEAD launched in late 2011 through a 5-year National Science Foundation (NSF) DataNet award to the University of Michigan, the University of Illinois and Indiana University. The initial phase supported proof-of-concept and prototype development for the sustainability science research community that is currently being extended and deployed as an operational capability.


Lab Notebooks in the Digital Age

Photo of Dr. Faulk

Christopher Faulk, Postdoctoral Fellow in Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health
Tuesday, May 20, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am (Date change due to Memorial Day)
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Watch recording

The transition from paper lab notebooks to the digital archives brings to light a long-neglected problem particular to academic labs, i.e. the proper archiving of lab notebooks and the data they contain. In this talk, Dr. Faulk will begin by discussing what exactly is a lab notebook, and the legal issues surrounding them. What happens when personnel leave a lab? Who has access to lab notebooks? What are the best practices for maintaining a notebook? These notebooks are the result of millions of research dollars spent annually, yet there is no systematic process for archival storage. Secondly, Dr. Faulk will discuss some of the new ideas in the transition to digital notebooks, and why many of them are impractical for the working scientist. We will have a follow-up panel discussion with several bench scientists to answer questions and share examples of lab notebooks.

Dr. Faulk is a 3rd year postdoc with over 10 years experience working in molecular, animal, and toxicological research. He work encompasses computational genomics (bioinformatics), and "wet lab" molecular genetics. His "notebooks" consist of the traditional bound paper notebook, collaborative online systems, and multi-terabyte data repositories.


The Library and MCubed

Image of MCubed logoPanel of Librarians
Monday, April 28, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Watch recording

MCubed is a new campus-wide interdisciplinary funding program focused on solving global, real-world problems. Each cube requires at least three faculty members across at least two different Schools to collaborate on a project. The majority of MCubed funding is to be spent on student and/or postdoc hires. Four Librarians were named on funded MCubed projects and others have worked closely with additional cubes. Librarians involved in cubes will be discussing their experiences across this wide range of projects. Discussed will be each librarian’s involvement and method for forming the cube, in addition to their work on the specific projects. Speakers:
Sigrid Cordell - Using the Digital to Read Literary Texts in Context
Jean Song (for Mark MacEachern)- Core Outcome Measures for Rotator Cuff Disorder
Marci Brandenburg - Scientific Needs Assessment and Analysis of Bioinformatics Tools to Support Clinical & Translational Research
Deirdre Spencer - Prison Creative Arts Project Image Archive


Should academics get down and dirty with YouTube? (Is there a role for academic institutions in online informal education?)

Andrew D. Maynard, Director of Risk Science Center
Monday, February 24, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery
Watch recording
Storify (Special thanks to Patricia Anderson for creating.)

Still image of a YouTube videoThere's a growing trend in online video being used as a informal education source by individuals. But beyond the publicly accessible Massive Open Online Courses offered by academic institutions, the most highly viewed educational content is generated by content creators without strong academic affiliations. As online informal education video content grows in sophistication and impact, should academic institutions be front and center of this new wave of education? And if so, how should they be engaging?


Evolutionary Biology in a Big and Open Data World

Photo of Dr. SmithStephen A. Smith, Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Monday, January 27, 2014 from 10 - 11:30 am
Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery Lab *Note location change!*
Watch recording
Storify (Special thanks to Patricia Anderson for creating.)

Emerging technologies for collecting molecular data have given researchers unprecedented access to genomic information. These new data have enormous potential for illuminating questions in biology, but the magnitude and complexity of this data continues to present challenges. Stephen will talk about how Big Data can be used to address questions in evolution biology and how Open culture in data sharing and software sharing contribute to these endeavors.


Please visit our list of 2013 events to watch recordings of previous events.

Page maintained by Sara M. Samuel
Last modified: 02/23/2015