2010-2012

Lynne Avadenka.  Plum Colored Regret.  No. 7 of 25 copies.

Huntington Woods, Michigan: Land Marks Press, 2010.

Avadenka responds in words and paintings to the poem of an anonymous Jewish woman who wrote in Muslim and Christian Spain sometime between 950 and 1492. The book opens with the original Hebrew text then spreads its English translation in large type across the pages with Avadenka’s response to the poem in smaller type, accompanied by lithographically reproduced brush paintings.

 

 

Bonnie Jo Campbell (1962– ).  The Solutions to Brian's Problem.  No. 6 of 20 copies, signed by both author and artist.

Huntington Woods, Michigan: Land Marks Press, 2011.

This short story comes from Michigan author Campbell’s collection titled American Salvage (Wayne State University Press, 2009), a National Book Award Finalist. Avadenka has taken this brief, seven-paragraph story of possible solutions to an impossible situation and turned it into a puzzle.

Bonnie Jo Campbell (1962– ).  The Solutions to Brian's Problem.  [continued]

The puzzle pieces of text and image are mounted on Michigan maple veneer and must be put together correctly to read the story.

 

 

Lynne Avadenka.  One by One.  No. 7 of 20 copies.

Huntington Woods, Michigan: Land Marks Press, 2011.

This is part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Coalition project, a memorial to a street of booksellers bombed in 2007 in Iraq.

Lynne Avadenka.  One by One.  [continued]

The artist was inspired by Wilfred Owen’s poem written in 1916 during World War I, “The Parable of the Old Man and the Young.”

 

 

Lynne Avadenka.  Jerusalem Calendar.  No. 3 of 18 copies.

Huntington Woods, Michigan: Land Marks Press, 2012.

A suite of prints based on original collages made while Avadenka was a Fellow of the American Academy in Jerusalem. The collages are composed of Jewish and secular calendars, maps of Jerusalem, and newspapers, each one including elements from a single calendar page, as well as parts of Hebrew and Arabic letters cut out, cut apart, and then used to imagine a lively and inventive alphabet.