Staff Manual: Promotion and Appointment of Librarians

Revised 5/16/2013.

Introduction

Librarians at the University of Michigan hold academic appointments and are part of the faculty of the University. As such, they have the responsibility to determine the rules of governance under which they may seek to advance their careers as librarians. The policies and procedures that follow describe the process whereby librarians obtain their appointments and are promoted within the University Library System.

The foundation of these procedures is a focus on personal growth and achievement rather than on the responsibilities of a particular position. It acknowledges that in a large research library there are many paths toward professional excellence. It assumes an underlying premise that each librarian must take responsibility for the direction and pace of his/her own career. In a system as rich and diverse as this academic library, these procedures must provide flexibility for advancement for the many specialists and managers that comprise the University Library.

The current iteration of the promotion and appointment procedures for librarians is an attempt to improve on the preceding guidelines. It strives to create a system that provides incentives for promotion throughout a career, that removes the existing barriers to promotion, and that is comparable with governance systems for librarians at other institutions.

General Procedures

Librarians at the University of Michigan are classified into one of four ranks:

  • Assistant Librarian,
  • Associate Librarian,
  • Senior Associate Librarian, and
  • Librarian.

These ranks represent stages in the professional development of the librarian’s career.

General characteristics of these four stages are as follows:

Assistant Librarian
beginner; little experience; developing identity and specialization; beginning professional activities and contributions to library/university community; demonstrates basic skills as a general librarian; works in the context of a unit doing work that is well-defined, short-term, limited in scope, supervised; contributes to planning and managing within a unit; exerts some influence and impact within the unit and larger organization.
Associate Librarian
some experience; competent specialist; contributes to professional organizations and activities (editing, co-authoring, member of committees, etc.) and active on committees and service groups; demonstrates broader skills, greater independence, speaking and writing for varying audiences with only some review; works in context of area of specialization doing complex yet well-defined tasks and projects both within unit and with other units; plans and manages within unit; exerts greater influence and impact within unit and library.
Senior Associate Librarian
experienced; shows growth and achievement in specialty; contributes and leads in professional activities (research and publication, chairing committees, initiating activities, etc.) and with service groups having a wider scope within the library, university, and/or community; displays breadth and depth of skills, working with an array of audiences, application, and level of formality; works in context of area of specialization in unit and in library at large; plans and manages within unit and among units; exerts significant influence and impact within unit, other particular areas of the library, and possibly the profession at large.
Librarian
broadly experienced; “master” specialist; excellent contributions to profession and specialty, and in service to library, university, and community; demonstrates skills in all aspects of academic librarianship; works with minimal supervision in area of specialization, within and beyond the library, and with colleagues throughout academe; plans and manages for area of responsibility and library at large; broad and sometimes final influence and impact.

The ranking for every librarian is based on how closely the individual matches the characteristics of that rank. These characteristics are described for each rank in eight categories:

  1. Education and specialization
  2. Independence, responsibility, judgment
  3. Organizational skills, planning, supervision, management
  4. Communication
  5. Creativity, initiative, vision, entrepreneurship
  6. Influence, impact
  7. Professional activities
  8. Service

The descriptions for each category found in the document, “Criteria for Promotion and Appointment of Librarians” (see Appendix 1) offer a more complete picture of an academic librarian operating at a particular stage in his/her professional development. The descriptions allow for flexibility and choice for each individual in the development of his/her career. It is understood that no one person is likely to be at the same level in all categories, nor be active in all possible areas within a category. It is the composite picture of the individual, which ultimately determines rank. It is expected that the criteria will need review as the profession continues to change. (See Appendix 4.)

Promotion Review Committee

The Promotion Review Committee (PRC) is responsible for all tasks associated with the classification of librarian staff who request promotions (with the exception of the University Librarian and the Associate University Librarians). The PRC also works with members of Library Human Resources (LHR) to develop and present informational workshops about the classification and promotion processes to librarian staff on a regular and frequent basis.

Membership

The Promotion Review Committee consists of six voting members, four being elected and two being appointed by the University Librarian. Two immediate past members serve as alternates. In the unusual event that an additional alternate is needed, s/he will be one of the two preceding past members of the PRC. The Director, Administrative Services acts as a resource person. The voting members and alternates are distributed as evenly as possible among the three upper ranks of librarians, among Public Services, Technical and Access Services, Digital Library Initiatives, Administrative Services, Library Administration, and among different library units. These librarians must hold a continuing appointment or a term appointment of at least 50% FTE that extends beyond the term of Committee service. A member completing a three-year term followed by a one-year term as an alternate will be eligible for election or appointment for another term after an interval of four years.

Committee members serve for three-year terms, with a fourth year of availability provided in order to serve as an alternate voting member when needed. The two people assisting in the classification of a new hire are drawn from this group of librarians (see section on “Rank at Appointment”). Two new members are added to the Committee each year. An incomplete term of an elected member is filled through a special election; an incomplete term of an appointed member is filled by the University Librarian.

Election

In September of each year, the University Librarian appoints a Nominating Committee consisting of three former members of the Promotion Review Committee. The Nominating Committee solicits nominations from librarian staff and prepares a slate of candidates to present for election in October. The Nominating Committee has the responsibility for presenting a slate of candidates that promotes diversity and balance within the Promotion Review Committee. It is recommended that the Nominating Committee specifically request nominations from librarian members of the Library Diversity Committee. Nominating Committee members confer with potential candidates and their supervisors regarding the investment of time and energy involved in the work of the PRC. Elections are conducted by the University Librarian’s office. New members join the PRC at the beginning of January.

Promotion

Any incumbent at the Assistant, Associate, or Senior Associate level may submit a request for promotion to the next rank. Typically, this request is submitted after at least three years of employment at a particular rank. A request may be submitted earlier if the applicant's senior manager and AUL agree to support it.

Requests for promotion are submitted by July 1 (or the first business day following July 1) of each year.

This includes full- and part-time librarians and librarians holding successive term appointments. The librarian initiates the procedure after being notified of eligibility by Library Human Resources or in any year thereafter, according to her/his own belief that sufficient change, growth, and development have occurred to warrant reassessment of rank. Promotion at the University of Michigan University Library is an entirely voluntary system established to provide flexibility and choice for each individual in the development of his/her career and to reward professional growth and accomplishment.

Librarians who have served at a particular rank for a minimum of three years are notified of their eligibility to apply for promotion by Library Human Resources by June 1, with submission of promotion materials due December 10 (see Appendix 2). The librarian may withdraw from the promotion review process at any time before December 10. S/he may re-enter the review process the next year.

The documentation package must include all items from Category I and selected or all materials from Category II as follows:

Category I: Evaluative Documentation

  1. Curriculum Vitae
  2. The librarian’s description of achievements and growth accomplished since the date of appointment or the last promotion (limit of 2,000 to 3,000 words).
  3. The supervisor’s written recommendation for promotion and summary of assessments written since the date of appointment or the last promotion.
  4. Names and addresses of no more than seven people who have agreed to write letters of recommendation. Guidelines for the selection of references are provided by LHR. Promotion requests for the upper two ranks should include letters from references outside of the University Library.
  5. Job description(s) (to be used as an aid in understanding some of the accomplishments being described)

Category II: Supporting Documentation

  1. Samples of work that reflect the nine areas of evaluation
  2. Samples of kudos [i.e., unsolicited letters of praise]
  3. An annotated list of publications, presentations, electronic products, etc.

Other types of material may be included in the documentation package as the candidate and supervisor deem appropriate.

The process of promotion for the supervisor involves support of the librarian and advice throughout the process, a written summary of the librarian’s accomplishments and growth, and a written recommendation for promotion (as listed in Category I).

PRC receives the promotion review packet from LHR and agrees to send its recommendation to the University Librarian by May 1. A quorum for the vote on promotion is five members of PRC. A member of PRC may recuse her/himself from participating in a promotion review in the following circumstances:

  • in the case of a supervisor/supervisee relationship
  • in the case of a personal relationship
  • in the case of a conflict of interest
  • in the case of a personal conflict

Similarly, a librarian being considered for promotion may request that a member of PRC be excused from participating in the review if s/he feels that any of the above circumstances apply. This option may be exercised once in the promotion request.

After receiving the PRC’s recommendation, the University Librarian makes the final decision concerning promotion and notifies the candidate and his/her supervisor of the result. In the case of a negative decision, the University Librarian meets with the candidate and his/her supervisor to discuss this outcome. (See Appendix 2 for relevant dates.) A candidate receiving a negative decision may submit a new request for promotion after two years.

If the candidate believes that the outcome has been negatively affected by a procedural discrepancy in the process, s/he may appeal to the University Librarian. The University Librarian is responsible for determining on a case-by-case basis what remedial action, if any, is appropriate. (See Appendix 2 for relevant dates.) If the candidate continues to have concerns, s/he may then consult the Library’s grievance procedure.

Rank by Appointment

The University Library desires to hire the best-suited librarians possible to support research and instruction at the University of Michigan. To remain competitive, the University Library requires an appointment system that is flexible and that can respond quickly during the recruitment process. Rank at appointment refers to the process of determining the classification for any librarian filling a vacant position in the University Library.

Position descriptions for vacancies are developed by supervisors in consultation with the Unit/Cluster Manager and/or the Associate University Librarian/University Librarian. These parties set the available budget for the position and establish the potential range for classification. The supervisor, in consultation with Library Human Resources, has the option of advertising a position at one or more ranks. When appointment is possible at more than one rank, the advertisement indicates that the rank will be based on qualifications and experience. Applicants will be expected to submit the usual materials (cover letter, curriculum vitae, and the names of at least three professional references), which will be used in combination with the interview to determine the appropriate rank when a finalist is selected. Applicants invited for interviews will be supplied with materials by LHR explaining the appointment process.

The supervisor, in consultation with two experienced members of the Promotion Review Committee and the appropriate Associate University Librarian, recommends the rank of the selected finalist to the University Librarian. The “Criteria for Promotion and Appointment of Librarians” document (see Appendix 1) is used as the basis for this process. The salary offer is determined, based on an equity review conducted by LHR and in consultation with the supervisor and the Associate University Librarian/University Librarian. The rank and salary form the basis of the appointment offer. Upon acceptance of the offer by the finalist, as indicated by an acceptance letter, the appointment is complete. The new librarian, including an incumbent librarian accepting a vacant position but not advancing in rank, may submit materials for reassessment of rank following the standard procedures for promotion.

Enclosures

  • Appendix 1—“Criteria for Promotion and Appointment of Librarians”
  • Appendix 2—“Timeline for the Promotion Process”
  • Appendix 3—“Transition Procedures”
  • Appendix 4—“Policy Questions and Review of Promotion Criteria”

Appendix 1: Criteria for Promotion and Appointment

ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN

Beginner; little experience; developing identity and specialization; beginning professional activities and contributions to library/university community; demonstrates basic skills as a general librarian; works in the context of a unit doing work that is well-defined, short-term, limited in scope, supervised; contributes to planning and managing within a unit; exerts some influence and impact within the unit and larger organization.

1. EDUCATION AND SPECIALIZATION

  • ALA-accredited Master's degree. A different advanced degree acceptable in some cases.
  • Is in the process of developing a professional identity and an appropriate level of technical competence.
  • Demonstrates general skills and knowledge of librarianship, information management, and technology.
  • May have some language or subject expertise.

2. INDEPENDENCE, RESPONSIBILITY, JUDGMENT

  • Works under close supervision.
  • Demonstrates independence, responsibility, and judgment in the context of well-defined, usually unit-based tasks, duties, and projects.

3. ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS, PLANNING, SUPERVISION, MANAGEMENT

  • Successful in organizing individual tasks and specific, well-defined projects.
  • Contributes to unit planning and/or policy decisions.
  • Where there is supervisory responsibility, displays supervisory skills with support staff working on well-defined tasks and projects.
  • Applies managerial skills to short-term projects or those of limited scope.

4. COMMUNICATION

  • Communicates chiefly with persons within the unit or to whom the unit directly relates.
  • Demonstrates success with public speaking, and with writing that is generally reviewed by supervisors.
  • Communication is usually task-based, such as teaching a class according to approved guidelines, or publishing library guides, procedure manuals, bibliographies, Web pages, etc.

5. CREATIVITY, INITIATIVE, VISION, ENTREPRENEURSHIP

  • Demonstrates ability and willingness to take risks and apply creative problem-solving to issues within a unit or project.
  • Identifies opportunities for initiating or improving services and client relations.

6. INFLUENCE, IMPACT

  • Influences short-range planning and decision-making primarily within the unit.
  • Exercises influence in the context of specific job responsibilities and task force or committee activities.
  • Impact of decision-making is such that errors can be detected before adversely affecting the unit or the Library.

7. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

  • Establishes membership in professional organizations.
  • Attends professional conferences or workshops
  • Takes advantage of professional development opportunities.
  • May be involved at some level in research, writing, or other relevant creative activity such as poster sessions or presentations.

8. SERVICE

  • Participates as an effective member of committees and teams, primarily within the unit.

ASSOCIATE LIBRARIAN

Some experience; competent specialist; contributes to professional organizations and activities (editing, co-authoring, member of committees, etc.) and active on committees and service groups; demonstrates broader skills, greater independence, speaking and writing for varying audiences with only some review; works in context of area of specialization doing complex yet well-defined tasks and projects both within unit and with other units; plans and manages within unit; exerts greater influence and impact within unit and library.

1. EDUCATION AND SPECIALIZATION

  • ALA-accredited Master's degree. A different advanced degree acceptable in some cases.
  • Demonstrates competency in a specific area of librarianship.

2. INDEPENDENCE, RESPONSIBILITY, JUDGMENT

  • Works under general supervision.
  • Demonstrates independence, responsibility, and judgment in the context of area of specialization and with varied, complex, yet well-defined projects or operations.
  • Commits resources within a well-defined area, makes recommendations for action, sets priorities for personal work and possibly for others within the unit.

3. ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS, PLANNING, SUPERVISION, MANAGEMENT

  • Successful in organizing and coordinating work in complex projects and/or among functional units.
  • Participates in planning and policy-setting for area of specialization and for a well-defined segment of the Library (a unit or functional units).
  • Where there is supervisory responsibility, demonstrates supervisory skills with staff of all levels, working on tasks involving multiple functions, and including coaching and encouraging of staff in the growth and development of skills.
  • Demonstrates managerial skills in area of responsibility and with work having moderate scope, possibly involving a unit, function, budget, and/or collection.

4. COMMUNICATION

  • Communicates within and outside the Library with a wide range of clients, including Library and University faculty, staff, and students, colleagues, vendors, and individuals and groups of diverse backgrounds and informational needs.
  • Successful in speaking in various settings and levels of formality, and on behalf of the organization within defined parameters.
  • Written communication may include correspondence, articles for publication, grant proposals, planning documents, etc. many of which are reviewed by a supervisor.

5. CREATIVITY, INITIATIVE, VISION, ENTREPRENEURSHIP

  • Demonstrates initiative, resourcefulness, and originality of thought and approach in problem-solving within limits established for the functional unit.
  • Investigates and proposes for implementation new methods, techniques, procedures, and services.
  • Identifies and acts upon opportunities for initiating or enhancing services and client relations within scope of responsibility.
  • Exhibits understanding of future trends in her/his specialization.
  • Acts as primary contact for defined clientele; brings services to the attention of clients and colleagues.

6. INFLUENCE, IMPACT

  • Influences recommendations and decisions primarily within the unit, but may also influence Library-wide decisions and issues as a member or chair of committees or task forces.
  • Exerts considerable impact on programs and tasks within the unit and may be the person principally responsible for the success or failure of specific activities.
  • Acts as contributor rather than final arbiter.
  • Contributes to Library, University, and the profession through a growing awareness and understanding about library issues, policies, objectives, programs, and trends.

7. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

  • Contributes to the profession, whether through professional organization or through other efforts. Activities may include work on a committee, task force, or other group; work on projects sponsored by professional organizations; or activity in other professional efforts.
  • Is involved at some level in research, writing, publishing, or other relevant creative activity.
  • May serve as a mentor to new librarians, graduate students, or undergraduate students.

8. SERVICE

  • Contributes as an effective member and/or leader of committees and teams, primarily with groups within the Library.

SENIOR ASSOCIATE LIBRARIAN

Experienced; shows growth and achievement in specialty; contributes and leads in professional activities (research and publication, chairing committees, initiating activities, etc.) and with service groups having a wider scope within the library, university, and/or community; displays breadth and depth of skills, working with an array of audiences, application, and level of formality; works in context of area of specialization in unit and in library at large; plans and manages within unit and among units; exerts significant influence and impact within unit, other particular areas of the library, and possibly the profession at large.

1. EDUCATION AND SPECIALIZATION

  • ALA-accredited Master's degree. A different advanced degree acceptable in some cases.
  • Additional relevant graduate degree, or progress toward one, is recommended.
  • Demonstrates expertise and continued growth in area of specialization.

2. INDEPENDENCE, RESPONSIBILITY, JUDGMENT

  • Works under limited supervision.
  • Demonstrates independence, responsibility, and judgment in the context of area of specialization and with activities that are broad-based, possibly unit-wide, and/or long-term.
  • Commits range of resources within area of responsibility, is accountable for success of tasks and projects within the job assignment, sets priorities for work accomplished in area of responsibility, makes final recommendations for commitment of resources and action in broad areas of activity.

3. ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS, PLANNING, SUPERVISION, MANAGEMENT

  • Organizational skills evidenced by successfully handling many (often simultaneous and conflicting) demands, utilizing whatever resources are available, and including coordination of staff from other units as appropriate.
  • Manages planning process in area of responsibility and participates in planning and policy-setting for unit, cluster, and division.
  • Where there is supervisory responsibility, demonstrates supervisory skills with staff of all levels, usually involving multiple units and/or functions, and including counseling and advising of colleagues contributing to their professional growth and development.
  • Manages resources effectively to accomplish duties which are usually of a larger and more complex scope. Resources can include personnel, budgets, collections, equipment, facilities, etc. in one or more functional units.

4. COMMUNICATION

  • Communicates with a broad variety of persons both within and outside the organization, often speaking for the functional unit or the Library at large, effectively presenting Library policy.
  • Exhibits flexibility of communication in terms of audience addressed.
  • Successful in oral communication ranging from informal conversations with individuals and small groups to prepared addresses and lectures.
  • Successful in written communication which covers a wide range of types, and which is usually not reviewed by a supervisor.

5. CREATIVITY, INITIATIVE, VISION, ENTREPRENEURSHIP

  • Identifies, analyzes, and resolves varied and complex problems through application of experience, creativity, intuition, and informed analysis.
  • Develops, initiates, and integrates new methods, techniques, procedures, and services in and among units.
  • Creates environment in area of responsibility that generates new ideas, fosters creative problem-solving, and encourages staff initiative.
  • Applies understanding of current and future trends in specialization and area of responsibility.
  • Develops and manages services and client relations within area of responsibility.
  • Brings services and activities to the attention of Library administration, clients, and colleagues at this and other institutions.

6. INFLUENCE, IMPACT

  • Makes final decisions and has significant influence on issues that affect area of responsibility, including commitment of resources.
  • Responsible for success or failure of project activities and programmatic elements in area of responsibility.
  • Commits resource allocation on long-term basis.
  • Exerts substantial influence concerning issues, policies, objectives, programs, and trends within the Library, University, and the profession based on a proven record of achievement in area of specialization and a broad understanding of issues within academic librarianship.

7. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

  • Demonstrates professional growth by the level of involvement or accomplishment within professional organizations or other professional efforts.
  • Pursues opportunities beyond the University Library in research, writing, publishing, or other relevant creative activity, such as speaking, teaching, or mentoring.
  • Contributes to developments in area of specialization, demonstrating an appropriate level of understanding of current and future trends.

8. SERVICE

  • Serves the Library and University as an effective member and/or leader of a team, committee, or larger organization that benefits the Library or the University, including work with groups comprised of faculty and staff from units throughout the University.

LIBRARIAN

Broadly experienced; "master" specialist; excellent contributions to profession and specialty, and in service to library, university, and community; demonstrates skills in all aspects of academic librarianship; works with minimal supervision in area of specialization, within and beyond the library, and with colleagues throughout academe; plans and manages for area of responsibility and library at large; broad and sometimes final influence and impact.

1. EDUCATION AND SPECIALIZATION

  • ALA-accredited Master's degree. A different advanced degree acceptable in some cases.
  • Additional relevant graduate degree is highly recommended.
  • Demonstrates significant and substantial expertise in area of specialization.

2. INDEPENDENCE, RESPONSIBILITY, JUDGMENT

  • Works under minimal supervision.
  • Demonstrates highest degree of independent responsibility, judgment, and accountability within all areas of job assignment.
  • Makes decisions and final recommendations that commit resources on a long-term basis, is responsible for the consequences of personal decisions or those made by staff in his/her area of responsibility.

3. ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS, PLANNING, SUPERVISION, MANAGEMENT

  • Demonstrates organizational skills relating to oversight and coordination of several complex or diverse functions, programs, and/or projects.
  • Participates in the formation and effective implementation of plans and policies affecting any segment of the organization.
  • Where there is supervisory responsibility, demonstrates supervisory skills with all levels of staff, including responsibility for multiple units and for making final decisions regarding personnel matters.
  • Counsels and mentors colleagues across divisional and institutional lines.
  • Demonstrates excellent leadership in the management of a broad operational area(s) or unit(s), generally including planning, budgeting, policy- and decision-making, and supervision.

4. COMMUNICATION

  • Communicates with a broad range of contacts both within and outside the organization, interpreting Library policy and/or professional issues involving complex subject matter and conceptual approaches.
  • Exhibits flexibility of communication in terms of audience addressed, including skill and tact in difficult situations.
  • Demonstrates excellence in oral and written communication within a wide range of settings and types of writings, possibly including reports of research studies, professional or subject-based publications, or documents of library-wide significance.

5. CREATIVITY, INITIATIVE, VISION, ENTREPRENEURSHIP

  • Demonstrates exceptional innovative development, planning, implementation, and problem-solving skills based on experience, creativity, intuition, and informed analysis.
  • Proposes new services and new service approaches in a Library-wide context; develops and implements strategies for integrating same into established policies and procedures within broad area of responsibility.
  • Leads staff and colleagues in area of responsibility, demonstrating and encouraging innovative, results-oriented thinking.
  • Initiates, recognizes, and rewards entrepreneurial approach to project and program development and implementation.
  • Initiates, develops, integrates, and oversees positive client relations within area of responsibility.
  • Works with Library administration and with Library and University public relations staff to publicize activities and services to as broad an audience as appropriate.

6. INFLUENCE, IMPACT

  • Influences significant, long-range planning and decision-making, extending to all levels of staff, internal and external clientele, and the profession, and affecting collections, budgets, projects, programs, policies, and procedures. May be the final authority in some or all of these areas.
  • Serves as a leader within the Library, the University, and the profession, exhibiting substantial breadth and depth of understanding about library issues, policies, objectives, programs, and trends.
  • Impact of decision-making is substantial, demonstrable, and can be irreversible.

7. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

  • Demonstrates excellence in professional accomplishments and contributions to the profession through work within professional and/or scholarly organizations or mastery of the area of specialization exhibited through research and publication, teaching, consulting work, or other relevant creative activity.
  • Recognized as a leader by peers beyond the University of Michigan.

8. SERVICE

  • Shows evidence of exceptional achievement in service that benefits the University Library, contributes to the educational mission of the University through University-wide activities, and/or involves a high level of public service in the community as an extension of his/her career as a librarian.

Appendix 2: Timeline for the Promotion Process (Revised Spring 2002)

During May

The Promotion Review Committee and Library Human Resources hold an informational/instructional session on the promotion process. This session is open to any interested staff member.

By June 1

Library Human Resources notifies those librarians newly eligible for promotion. Their supervisors are notified at the same time.

By July 1

Candidates notify Library Human Resources of their intent to submit a request for promotion.

By July 15

Librarians submit the names and addresses of references to be solicited by LHR.

September 1

Library Human Resources mails letters to prospective references.

November 1

Reference letters are due in Library Human Resources.

By December 10

Candidates submit their promotion materials to Library Human Resources.

January 2

Promotion dossiers are made available to the Promotion Review Committee which begins reviewing them.

By May 1

Promotion Review Committee completes its reviews of promotion materials and submits recommendations to the University Librarian.

By June 1

The University Librarian makes the final decisions concerning promotions, and notifies the candidates and their supervisors of the results.

By June 15

In cases of a negative decision, the University Librarian meets with the candidate and his/her supervisor to discuss the results.

By July 1

If the candidate believes that the outcome has been negatively affected by a procedural discrepancy in the process, s/he may appeal to the University Librarian.

By July 15

The University Librarian responds to the candidate and his/her supervisor regarding any appeal of the promotion process.

Appendix 3: Transition Procedures

How was the first PRC formed?

In mid- to late-summer of 1999, the University Librarian appointed a Nominating Committee consisting of three or four members. The Nominating Committee solicited nominations from librarian staff and prepared a slate of candidates to present in October for election of four of the six-member Promotion Review Committee (two members were appointed by the University Librarian). The initial Committee members had staggered terms, with two members elected for a one-year term plus one year of service as an alternate, two members for two-year terms plus one year as an alternate, and two members for three-year terms plus one year as an alternate. Beginning with the 2000 election, members were elected for the normal term of three years plus one year as an alternate.

The Nominating Committee has responsibility for presenting a slate of candidates that will promote the diversity and balance of the Committee membership. It is recommended that the Nominating Committee specifically request nominations from librarian members of the Library Diversity Committee. Nominating Committee members confer with potential candidates and their supervisors regarding the investment of time and energy that will be involved in the work of the Promotion Review Committee. Elections are conducted by the University Librarian’s office. The first Promotion Review Committee is formed during December 1999. The Nominating Committee takes responsibility for orientation of the Promotion Review Committee in January 2000, with the work of the Committee beginning in February 2000.

How was the second PRC formed?

In September of 2000, the University Librarian appointed a Nominating Committee consisting of three members drawn from the 1999 Nominating Committee members and the two outgoing members of the Promotion Review Committee. In subsequent years, the Nominating Committee will be drawn from former members of the Promotion Review Committee.

How are PRC’s procedures established?

Using the “Criteria for Promotion and Classification of Librarians,” the first Promotion Review Committee develops operating procedures for the review and is responsible for documenting these for future Committee members. It is expected that operating procedures will evolve over the first few years of the Promotion Review Committee’s existence and that evolving operations also will be documented and passed on to future members.

How will the first PRC’s workload be managed?

All librarians retain their current rank until they are granted promotion upon review. If the workload of PRC requires, applications will be reviewed first for those librarians who have become eligible in the current year and second on the basis of seniority and/or pending retirement.

Appendix 4: Policy Questions and Review of Promotion Criteria

For questions and issues of policy that arise, and for review of the promotion criteria, the Promotion Review Committee (PRC) proceeds as follows.

  • The PRC prepares an explanation of the questions needing resolution regarding policy or the promotion criteria. The PRC may also draft a recommendation for resolution of the issue.
  • This document is presented to the Forum Executive Committee and is shared with the University Librarian.
  • The Forum Executive Committee has three options:
    • to endorse the recommendation as presented.
    • to appoint a task force to study the issue and submit a report to the Forum Executive Committee.
    • to refer the question to the Forum as a whole for discussion and resolution.
  • Once the Forum Executive Committee or the Forum as a whole has acted, the resulting recommendation is sent to the University Librarian for his/her approval.
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