Videos

This is Not About Surrealism

Date: 
October 15, 2015
Running Time: 
79:12

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Dada and Surrealism, Michael Lowy and Penelope Rosemont, whose works have defined the Surrealist movement of the second half of the 20th century and into the 21st, talk about surrealist women and Walter Benjamin.
Surrealist Women, lecture by Penelope Rosemont This year, the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Cafe Voltaire in Zurich and the beginning of Dada, women poets, writers, painters, dancers, even puppeteers need to be remembered for their contributions to these avant-guard movements. Yet their contributions are still neglected and often unknown. Hear about their past and continuing contributions to our expanding ideas sexual liberation,  the future of women and the liberation of the human mind from Hannah Höch to Jayne Cortez and beyond.
Walter Benjamin and Surrealism (1929) : "a radical idea of freedom," lecture by Michael Lowy Walter Benjamin's essay on Surrealism from 1929 is a fascinating piece. The Jewish-German philosopher understood perfectly that Surrealism was not a literary affair, but a revolutionary movement of the spirit. "Since Bakunin, Europe lacks a radical idea of freedom. The Surrealists have it." For Benjamin, the greatest quality of surrealism is "to win for revolution the forces of intoxication."

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Last modified: 10/27/2015

Authors' Forum Presents: A Prehistory of the Cloud

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
October 13, 2015
Running Time: 
75:36

Tung-Hui Hu examines the gap between the real and the virtual in our understanding of the cloud in his book, A Prehistory of the Cloud. We may imagine the digital cloud as placeless, mute, ethereal, and unmediated, yet the reality of the cloud is embodied in thousands of massive data centers, any one of which can use as much electricity as a midsized town. But even all these data centers are only one small part of the cloud. Megan Sapnar Ankerson will join the conversation with Hu.

Tung-Hui Hu, a former network engineer, is assistant professor of English at U-M and the recipient of a 2015 NEA literature fellowship.

Professor John Cheney-Lippold comes to Ann Arbor from the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at USC to join the U-M cluster faculty in Digital Environments. His research and teaching explore the relationship between new media, technology, identity, and the concept of privacy. Professor Cheney-Lippold is currently completing a manuscript on how computer algorithms that employ personal data change the ways in which we understand and define categories like race, class, gender, and citizenship.

Page maintained by Jeffrey Collins
Last modified: 11/05/2015

Dr. Farha Abbasi: Mental Health Stigma in the Muslim Community

Date: 
October 5, 2015
Running Time: 
60:00

Dr. Fahra Abbasi, of Michigan State University, delves into the stigma surrounding mental health, in the Muslim community.  
She explores the notion of how faith and mental health are deeply connected, when approaching mental health issues.
Abbasi also discusses the history of Islam, through the lens of women's rights.

 

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Last modified: 10/27/2015

Passing for Mexican: Relational Identities in Latina/o Chicago

Date: 
October 2, 2015
Running Time: 
82:55

Professor Frances R. Aparicio (Northwestern University), a former faculty member at U-M,
describes the presentation as: "Based on twenty interviews with Latina/o individuals who are of two or more Latin American national origins, I identify three modes of 'passing' that allow Intralatina/os a sense of belonging within the 'contextual dominance' of Mexican Chicago. In these relational power dynamics, second-generation Intralatina/os engage the slippages between the 'Mexican' and 'Latina/o' common in dominant discourses, their affective (dis)identifications with the larger Mexican community, as well as their own family histories that inform their personal and social negotiations as they struggle to belong in Latina/o Chicago. She proposes new 'horizontal hierarchies' that can reveal these relational negotiations among US Latina/os."
The Latina/o Studies Program has organized this event as a part of Latina/o Heritage Month and the 80th Anniversary Celebration of the Department of American Culture.
Frances R. Aparicio is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University. She has previously taught at Stanford University, University of Arizona, University of Michigan, and University of Illinois at Chicago.  

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Last modified: 10/14/2015

Plurality of Love: Cafecito and Lecture

Date: 
September 30, 2015
Running Time: 
81:00

Discussion about Rolando Estévez's books and art with the artist himself and Ruth Behar, Victor Haim Perera Collegiate Professor of Anthropology at U-M. At 4:30pm, Behar and Estévez will speak about his current work as an independent bookmaker and how the arts are evolving in Cuba.

 

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Last modified: 10/27/2015

The Author's Forum Presents: Broadcasting Modernity: Cuban Commercial Television, 1950-1960

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
September 29, 2015
Running Time: 
80:24

In this Authors' Forum event, Yeidy Rivero and Ruth Behar discuss Rivero’s latest book. In Broadcasting Modernity: Cuban Commercial Television, 1950-1960, Rivero not only demonstrates television's importance to Cuban cultural identity formation, she explains how the medium functions in society during times of radical political and social transformation.

Yeidy M. Rivero is Professor of American Culture and Screen Arts and Cultures at U-M. Ruth Behar is Victor Haim Perera Collegiate Professor of Anthropology at U-M.

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Last modified: 11/05/2015

Emergent Research: Wikipedia and Higher Education

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
September 28, 2015
Running Time: 
82:48

Are Wikipedia and higher education natural allies? What are the inherent benefits and challenges of that alliance? U-M faculty members Cliff Lampe (School of Information) and Anne McNeil (Chemistry), along with librarian Ye Li, will discuss their experiences using Wikipedia in the classroom, and the relationship between the Wikipedia community and academia.
 
Cliff Lampe is an associate professor in the U-M School of Information. Previously, he spent six years as an assistant professor in the College of Communication Arts and Sciences at Michigan State University. He researches the social and technical structures of large scale technology mediated communication, working with sites like Facebook, Wikipedia, Slashdot and Everything2. He has also been involved in the creation of multiple social media and online community projects, usually designed to enable collective action. One of Cliff's core values is combining top quality research with community engagement.

Anne McNeil is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Associate Professor in Chemistry and Macromolecular Science and Engineering. Her research interests include chemical education, homogeneous catalysis, and small molecule and polymer synthesis and applications. She has incorporated Wikipedia content creation as a group project in several graduate courses here at Michigan. To date, over 150 students have made substantive contributions to the science content on Wikipedia, with several pages being highlighted on the front page of Wikipedia. This exercise provides excellent training for graduate students in communication, writing, teamwork, and literature searching. At the same time, we are increasing the quality and quantity of scientific information available to the general public.

Ye Li is the Chemistry Librarian at U-M. Besides managing chemical information resources, she provides instruction and research consultations on scientific information and data in Chemistry and related fields.  Since 2010, she and other librarians have been supporting classes using Wikipedia editing as course projects in collaboration with instructors from various disciplines, including Chemistry, Social Work, Information Science, History, Natural Resources and Environment etc. Ye is also working on research projects in developing standards and infrastructure for data and information sharing in Chemistry.  

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Last modified: 11/04/2015

Where the Light Gets In: Writing From the Margin

Date: 
September 28, 2015
Running Time: 
67:30

Leah Hager Cohen, author of five novels and five works of non-fiction, talks about sharing stories. Sharing stories – narrating our own and listening to others’ – is intrinsic to our humanity. Stories hold great power, yet the art of storytelling (and story-receiving) requires humility, vulnerability, recognition of our limits.

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Last modified: 11/16/2016

IP and DC: University of Michigan's Role in Shaping Intellectual Property Policy

Date: 
September 24, 2015
Running Time: 
58:54

Mike Waring, Director of the Washington, DC Office and Executive Director of Federal Relations for the University of Michigan, discusses his work as a lobbyist, serving as a liaison for communication between the University of Michigan and the federal government, educational associations, professional societies, and public policy organizations on a wide range of intellectual property matters of core interest to the University community.
Waring began his career as a TV/radio news reporter and producer and later served as Vice President of Government Relations for the National Association of Broadcasters. An active U-M alum (LSA '74), he served as President of the University of Michigan Club of Washington, D.C. and later as treasurer of the University of Michigan Alumni Association.

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Last modified: 11/05/2015

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