Videos

Game On! Video Game Research & Teaching at the University of Michigan

Courtesy of flickr member Patrick hoesly: http://www.flickr.com/photos/zooboing/4543757687/
Courtesy of flickr member Patrick hoesly: http://www.flickr.com/photos/zooboing/4543757687/
Date: 
November 13, 2013
Running Time: 
90:13

A panel discussion with U-M faculty who work with video games as they discuss their game-related research and how they integrate games into their teaching. Panelists include Sheila Murphy, Screen Arts & Cultures; Sean Silver, English; and Erik Hildinger, Engineering/Technical Communications.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 11/21/2013

Daughters of Fire: Tom Peek Discusses His New Novel

Daughters of Fire bookcover
Date: 
October 29, 2013
Running Time: 
79:19
Author Tom Peek talks about his mystical novel Daughters of Fire, which illuminates how the Hawaiian islands' transformation into a tourist mecca and developers’ gold mine sparked a Native Hawaiian movement to reclaim their culture, protect sacred land, and step into the future with wisdom. A visiting astronomer falls in love with a Hawaiian anthropologist who guides him into a Polynesian world of 
volcanoes, gods, and revered ancestors.
Peek, winner of a 2013 Benjamin Franklin Silver Finalist Award by the Independent Book Publishers Association, has lived for 25 years in Hawai‘i, where he has worked as a mountain and astronomy guide on Mauna Kea and an eruption ranger, wildland firefighter and exhibit writer in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. He has worked closely with Hawaiian elders and cultural practitioners and lives on Kilauea.
Page maintained by David Hytinen
Last modified: 11/15/2013

Open Access Week: Redefining Impact

Date: 
October 25, 2013
Running Time: 
89:19
The closing keynote address of Open Access Week. Mike Buschman, co-founder of Plum Analytics, reflects on two years of experience collecting, analyzing, and visualizing alternative metrics that measure academic research, showing how alternative metrics are being used today by research institutions as diverse at the University of Pittsburgh and the Smithsonian, scholarly publishers, and individual researchers.
While citation counts have long been the tried-and-true measure of academic research usage and impact, metrics can now be harvested and applied to research around usage, captures, mentions, and social media, in addition to citations, giving a much more comprehensive and holistic view of impact.
 
Page maintained by David Hytinen
Last modified: 11/05/2013

The Human Animal Bond

Date: 
October 22, 2013
Running Time: 
2:45
Hear about the health and mental health benefits of the animal-human bond. There is a live demonstration of the interaction between a Paws with a Cause dog and its client, with commentary by the dog’s trainer. See how they work together, and thus appreciate how helpful a service dog can be.
 
Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 02/04/2014

Engaged Learning: Emerging Campus Perspectives

Date: 
October 9, 2013
Running Time: 
77:58
What is engaged learning? What is happening with engaged learning on our campus? The Engaged Learning Task Force hosts the first of a series of panels and conversations exploring this issue.
 
This first panel features three campus leaders sharing their perspectives.
Page maintained by David Hytinen
Last modified: 11/05/2013

Author's Forum Presents: From Stone to Flesh: A Short History of the Buddha

Date: 
October 9, 2013
Running Time: 
76:31
U-M Professor Donald Lopez reads a short excerpt from his new book, From Stone to Flesh: A Short History of the Buddha, followed by conversation with Bill Zirinsky, owner of Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room, and ending with audience Q & A. Book sales provided by Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room.
About the book: We have come to admire Buddhism for being profound but accessible, as much a lifestyle as a religion. The credit for creating Buddhism goes to the Buddha, a figure widely respected across the Western world for his philosophical insight, his teachings of nonviolence, and his practice of meditation. But who was this Buddha, and how did he become the Buddha we know and love today?
The Author's Forum is a collaboration between the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, & Ann Arbor Book Festival.
Page maintained by David Hytinen
Last modified: 11/05/2013

American Foodways: The Jewish Contribution, 1660-2013

Date: 
September 24, 2013
Running Time: 
66:19

Exhibit opening of American Foodways: The Jewish Contribution. Jan Longone, Adjunct Curator in the U-M Special Collections Library, explores the multifaceted contributions of Jewish Americans, beginning with the first kosher butcher in America (1660) and the earliest Jewish cookbook published here in 1871. Among the topics discussed will be Butchers, Bakers and Market Men; Charitable Cooks and their Cookbooks (1888-2013); the Role of the Media; Restaurants, Delicatessens and Menus; Commercial Advertising Ephemera; A Chronology of Jewish-American Cookbook Publishing; Jewish-American Food Festivals; and more.

Page maintained by David Hytinen
Last modified: 11/05/2013

Emergent Research: Overview of the Bioinformatics and DNA Sequencing Cores

Date: 
September 23, 2013
Running Time: 
82:00
Dr. James Cavalcoli, Director of the Bioinformatics Core and Assistant Professor in the Department of Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics, and Dr. Robert Lyons, Director of the U-M DNA Sequencing Core, and Research Assistant Professor in the Biological Chemistry Department, provide an overview of the Bioinformatics and DNA Sequencing Cores, including information on existing and future equipment, techniques, and the variety of research they support. 
The Bioinformatics Core provides custom bioinformatics support to researchers using their expertise in computational methods; the DNA Sequencing Core provides high-quality, low cost DNA analysis for researchers.
Page maintained by David Hytinen
Last modified: 11/05/2013

Automatic Book Scanning: Designing the Linear Book Scanner from Google

book scanner
Date: 
September 11, 2013
Running Time: 
40:25
In 2012, Google announced the development of a prototype linear scanner, a robotic scanner that scans books without removing the spines and without damaging the book. Google has made the plans and patent of the scanner openly available. This Linear Book Scanner is a new type of automatic page-turning book scanner with a simple, low-cost design. The scanner has been projected at a cost of $1500 each, making it affordable and scalable since it is envisioned that one person can manage multiple scanners simultaneously.
 
The University of Michigan Library is collaborating with the Mechanical Engineering 450 class to improve and enhance the design. Join Dany Qumsiyeh, the designer of the Linear Book scanner at Google, as he discusses how the idea was formed and how the Linear Book Scanner works.  Dany also provides details on the design, motor control, and electronics involved, as well as list the technical challenges, limitation, and areas for improvement moving forward. A prototype of the scanner was on hand for the presentation.
Page maintained by David Hytinen
Last modified: 09/20/2013

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