Videos

The World Health Organization: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

Date: 
March 10, 2015
Running Time: 
85:2

In this participatory powerpoint presentation, Dr. Els Nieuwenhuijsen covers three key topics related to the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), which is the World Health Organization (WHO) framework for measuring health and disability at both individual and population levels.

  1.)  The background of the ICF: brief history, paradigm shift from the medical model, to the social model, to the bio-psycho-social model, and rationale.
   2.) The ICF concepts of health, functioning and disability: the main domains of functioning (body/structure, activities and participation level) and the interaction between these domains with environmental and personal factors. She will briefly cover the ICF codes.
  3.)  The utility of the ICF, ICF core sets, use of terms recommended by the WHO, and strategic areas.

Nieuwenhuijsen is adjunct faculty in the U-M Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and a volunteer pilot test coordinator of the Unitarian Universalist Association Accessibility and Inclusion Ministry (AIM) Certificate Program at the First Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Ann Arbor.

 

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Last modified: 03/19/2015

Stories of Impact: Faculty and Students Speak

Date: 
February 25, 2015
Running Time: 
69:00

Hear from faculty and students featured in the exhibit Learning in Real Life: Stories of Impact Through Engagement.  Cliff Lampe and Michelle Jackson talk about his project Citizen Interaction Design, which she participated in as a student; Tati Calixto and a few of her students share their experiences in Cusco, Peru as participants in an effort to preserve the traditional weaving practices in the region; and Preet Rana, Kate Saylor, Amby Gallagher and Norma Sarkar discuss their efforts to make their course, Community Health Nursing, a true global experience. 
The Learning in Real Life series is sponsored by the U-M Library, the Center for Engaged Academic Learning, and the Vice Provost for Global and Engaged Education.

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Last modified: 03/30/2015

Emergent Research: Research with Material Objects

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
February 23, 2015
Running Time: 
98:40

This cross-disciplinary panel discusses trends, issues, and challenges of doing research with material culture and material objects. Panelists also address the role of technology in facilitating their research process. Panelists include: Katie Lennard, PhD Candidate, Department of American Culture Archaeologists have long used artifacts to better understand life in ancient civilizations, but how can historians of the 19th and 20th century US use material goods to gain a new perspective on the more recent past? Katie's dissertation Made in America: Costume, Ritual, and the Ku Klux Klan 1905-1940 tracks the industrial production and national distribution of Ku Klux Klan robes in the early 20th century. This work draws significantly on data from examinations of extant Klan robes held in museum collections, but also relies on more traditional archival research to contextualize these artifacts. Katie's presentation will consider the value of material culture for historians, while also discussing what kind of information artifacts, particularly mass-produced goods, cannot provide. Tim Utter, Manager of the Clark Library Tim Utter is a Map Librarian and Manager of the Clark Library. Tim is very interested in how the variety of ways of seeing and representing place on maps affects our worldview, our shared experience as viewers, the map's story - its history and what it communicates to us, as well as map as cultural beacon. His research interests include Dutch maps of the 16th-17th centuries and pictorial maps. Daniel Fisher, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Earth and Environmental Sciences, Claude W. Hibbard Collegiate Professor of Paleontology, Curator and Director, Museum of Paleontology Professor Fisher's current research focuses on the paleobiology and extinction of mastodons and mammoths, elucidated by studies of growth increments and compositional time series (isotopic and elemental) sampled from their tusks and cheek teeth. Professor Fisher’s work on individual specimens and sites often involves construction of 3D models. While he typically works with these using specialized graphics software, he and his students are beginning to use formats that permit more general access, such as a "3D pdf." Another of Professor Fisher's research projects focuses on the baby woolly mammoth named Lyuba. At a recent annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, he and his colleagues (Shirley et al. 2011) presented results derived from CT scans of this specimen, some of which were used to create animations such as this: Lyuba CT Scan.

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Last modified: 03/26/2015

Engaged Scholarship Across the Faculty Roles: Mission, Method and Momentum

Date: 
February 13, 2015
Running Time: 
79:34

A lecture by Timothy Eatman, co-director of Imagining America: Artists and Scholars In Public Life at Syracuse University, where he teaches courses on American Colleges and Universities and Understanding Educational Research. Eatman joined Syracuse University after a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan in the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education.  At Michigan, Eatman worked with the IA Consortium, which has since moved to Syracuse University. IA, a national consortium of academic and community institutions designed to strengthen the public role and democratic purposes of the humanities, arts and design is involved in a national research and policy project called the Tenure Team Initiative on Public Scholarship under Eatman’s direction. The research focuses on improving the rewards system in academe for faculty who practice engaged scholarship in the cultural disciplines. 

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Last modified: 02/19/2015

On the University of Michigan, the Peace Corps, and the Enduring Bonds of Students and Teachers

Date: 
February 11, 2015
Running Time: 
77.00

Former U-M undergraduate student and current U-M professor Brian Arbic describes his experience as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer teacher in Liberia and Ghana, West Africa. He also describes a surprise reunion with his prize pupil from Ghana, Joseph Ansong, 20 years later, and how it led to Ansong's hiring by Arbic's lab in the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies. Ansong will add to the conversation.

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Last modified: 02/12/2015

All the Trees of the Forest: The Extraordinary Story of Israel's Woodlands

Series: 
PitE, SNRE Event
Date: 
January 27, 2015
Running Time: 
70.8

Dr. Alon Tal, Associate Professor of Desert Ecology at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and a visiting scholar at Michigan State University, talks about his 2013 book.
Israel’s woodlands carry the scars of past military invaders and conquests. But most of the trees in Israel’s forests are contemporary and represent an expression of recent national zeal to restore the woodlands of the Bible, making a harsh climate more hospitable.
Drawing on insider anecdotes, Tal describes how the trial and error process evolved that transformed drylands and degraded soils into flourishing parks, rangelands, and renewed ecosystems in a degraded countryside and how it might be relevant in the dozens of dryland countries suffering from deforestation and desertification.

 

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Last modified: 01/27/2015

Emergent Research: Systematic Reviews

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
January 26, 2015
Running Time: 
96:00

Informationists Mark MacEachern and Whitney Townsend, Taubman Health Sciences Library, offer overview of the systematic review publication type and discuss appropriate literature search methodologies, while describing their experiences working on these project teams and teaching a grant-supported CE workshop for librarians on the topic.
A systematic review is a type of research publication that has become an integral part of the health sciences and other fields. As a publication that relies heavily on literature searches, systematic reviews provide information professionals with an opportunity to significantly contribute to and impact the resulting research. A special focus will be placed on the flow and management of information through the systematic review process, and on the role of librarians in the identification, production, and assessment of these research publications.

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Last modified: 02/06/2015

Translation at Work: Promoting Translated Literature in the U.S.

Series: 
Translation at Work
Date: 
January 22, 2015
Running Time: 
85.8

This is one in a series of panels on the practice of literary translation presented by the Department of Comparative Literature as part of its ongoing effort to promote translation in all its forms across the U-M campus. Students can come to meet people working with literature outside of academia and learn about potential alternatives to an academic career. 

Panelists Include: Esther Allen, a distinguished translator and writer, teaches at Baruch College (CUNY) and serves on the board of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA). Laurence Marie is a culteral attaché at the Embassy of France in the United States and the Head of French Book Office in New York City. Jadranka Vrsalocic-Carevic, a translator and editor, is the director of the New York office of the Institut Ramon Lull, an agency responsible for the promotion of Catalan language and culture abroad. Etienne Charriere moderates the discussion.

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Last modified: 01/23/2015

The Components of Reputation: Searching for a Bicentennial Narrative for the University of Michigan

The Components of Reputation
Series: 
Clements Library
Date: 
January 20, 2015
Running Time: 
54.88

Francis X. Blouin Jr., U-M Professor of History and Professor in the School of Information talks about The Components of Reputation: Searching for a Bicentennial Narrative for the University of Michigan.
The University of Michigan was transformed in the late nineteenth century. Scholars at a handful of universities that would include the UM systematically reconsidered the relative importance of science and religion to how we understand the world around us. This discussion broadened the idea of and the application of science beyond an interest in natural phenomena. Out of these discussions came the very idea of the modern research university that persists today.

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Last modified: 01/20/2015

Cities Divided: The Persistence of Segregation in the American Metropolis

Cities Divided
Date: 
January 15, 2015
Running Time: 
108:35

In honor of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, this open conversation examines the causes, and explores potential solutions, to the persistence of segregation in U.S. cities.
With a focus on Detroit, we welcome guest speakers from the Michigan Roundtable. Panelists include: Melba Joyce Boyd, Professor and Chair of Africana Studies, Wayne State University, Margaret Brown, Executive Director of the Fair Housing Center, Detroit, Alex Hill, Community Health Worker and Research Project Coordinator, Wayne State University, Harley Etienne, Assistant Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Michigan, and Stacey Stevens, Manager Racial Equity Community Engagement Round Table, Detroit.

 

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Last modified: 01/20/2015

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