Videos

Mid-Michigan Digital Practitioners Meeting

Date: 
March 27, 2015
Running Time: 
64:8

9:15 AM-10:00 AM: Lightning Talks

. Recovery and Reuse of Legacy Digitization Data - Brian Wilson, The Henry Ford
. Digital materials at a Small Institutions - Megan O’Neill Kudzia, Albion College
. Digital Holland, Michigan Project - Geoff Reynolds, The Joint Archives of Holland
. Legacy Finding Aid Import into ArchivesSpace - Dallas Pillen, Bentley Historical Library
. MSU Special Collections Migration to ArchivesSpace - Nicole Smeltekop, MSU Libraries
. New Detroit Video Collection- Nathan Kelber, Detroit Historical Society
. Working with obsolete digital media: the case of the Robert Altman collection- Anthea Josias,
University of Michigan Library
. Preservica at GVSU - Annie Benefiel, Grand Valley State University
. Preservation Self-Assessment Program and Other Tools - Ryan Edge, MSU Libraries

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Last modified: 03/27/2015

Mid-Michigan Digital Practitioners Meeting (second half, morning sessions)

Date: 
March 27, 2015
Running Time: 
50:53

10:45 AM-11:30 AM: Host Presentation

. Update on ArchivesSpace-Archivematica-DSpace Workflow Integration project
. Implementing Aeon special collections software at the Bentley Historical Library
. Web Archives 2015: Capture, Curate, Analyze (upcoming symposium at the University of Michigan)

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Last modified: 03/27/2015

Authors' Forum: Mahmoud Darwish, The Poet’s Art and His Nation

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
March 25, 2015
Running Time: 
80:40

Mahmoud Darwish: The Poet’s Art and His Nation A conversation with author and U-M Associate Professor Khaled Mattawa and U-M Professor Anton Shammas about Mattawa's recent book, Mahmoud Darwish: The Poet's Art and His Nation.

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Last modified: 04/14/2015

Symposium: Art and the State

Date: 
March 24, 2015
Running Time: 
114:00

Symposium Participants include: Marina Grzinic is a theorist and artist from Ljubljana. She is one of the major contemporary theoretical and critical figures in Central and East European culture. She is professor at the Institute of Philosophy at the Scientific and Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts and at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, Austria. She publishes extensively, lectures worldwide, and has been involved in video art since 1982. Michail Ryklin is one of the leading contemporary Russian philosophers. Currently he is a senior fellow at the Internationales Kolleg Morphomata at the University of Cologne, professor emeritus at Humboldt University, and a senior fellow at the Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences. Ryklin is the author of multiple books, most recently, Book about Anna (2014), devoted to his late wife Anna Alchuk. Alchuk was one of the artists, writers and curators charged with “religious intolerance” for being part of an exhibition in Moscow in 2003. Sreten Ugricic is a philosopher, librarian, and the author of nine books, whose prose has been selected in several anthologies of contemporary Serbian literature. In January 2012, he was dismissed from his position as the director of the National Library of Serbia, which he held for eleven years, after publicly supporting freedom of speech and reading. He was accused of terrorism and forced by a political threat to leave the country and live abroad. He is currently a visiting scholar at Stanford University’s Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. Jasmina Tumbas is assistant professor of performance studies in the Department of Visual Studies at SUNY Buffalo. Tumbas completed her doctoral degree in art history and visual studies at Duke University in 2013. Her teaching and research fields focus on modern and contemporary art and theory, histories and theories of performance, body and conceptual art, art and activism, politics of contemporary visual culture, and critical theory. Organizers Irina Aristarkhova, associate professor of art and design, history of art, and women’s studies, U-M; Tatjana Aleksic, associate professor of Slavic languages and literatures and comparative literature, U-M. This event is part of the series, "Material Culture and Social Change in Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia." What is the role of material culture in defining national identity in everyday practices and in solidifying or fostering resistance to the state’s control of that definition? From home décor, housing projects, clothing, broken stones, graffiti, or visual arts, participants in this series highlight the importance of objects and “things” in the making of social life and politics and their transformation. Sponsors: Center for Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies; Avant-Garde Interest Group; Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design; Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies

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Last modified: 03/28/2015

Food Insecurity Panel

Date: 
March 23, 2015
Running Time: 
49:30

Panel of representatives from LSA and the School of Public Health discuss the contributing factors of food insecurity, and their efforts to diminish food insecurity in Washtenaw County.

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Last modified: 03/28/2015

Early Modern Maps of Paris – a History of Measures and Representations

Date: 
March 19, 2015
Running Time: 
76:2

Drawing from his definitive work, Les plans de Paris des origines (1493) à la fin du XVIIIe siècle (2e éd. 2007), Professor Jean Boutier discusses cartographic history using selected maps or atlases drawn from the Clark Library collections. A reception will follow the talk.

Boutier is Directeur d’Etudes at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Marseille) and visiting scholar in the U-M Department of History.

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Last modified: 03/19/2015

The World Health Organization: The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

Date: 
March 10, 2015
Running Time: 
85:2

In this participatory powerpoint presentation, Dr. Els Nieuwenhuijsen covers three key topics related to the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), which is the World Health Organization (WHO) framework for measuring health and disability at both individual and population levels.

  1.)  The background of the ICF: brief history, paradigm shift from the medical model, to the social model, to the bio-psycho-social model, and rationale.
   2.) The ICF concepts of health, functioning and disability: the main domains of functioning (body/structure, activities and participation level) and the interaction between these domains with environmental and personal factors. She will briefly cover the ICF codes.
  3.)  The utility of the ICF, ICF core sets, use of terms recommended by the WHO, and strategic areas.

Nieuwenhuijsen is adjunct faculty in the U-M Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and a volunteer pilot test coordinator of the Unitarian Universalist Association Accessibility and Inclusion Ministry (AIM) Certificate Program at the First Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Ann Arbor.

 

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Last modified: 03/19/2015

Stories of Impact: Faculty and Students Speak

Date: 
February 25, 2015
Running Time: 
69:00

Hear from faculty and students featured in the exhibit Learning in Real Life: Stories of Impact Through Engagement.  Cliff Lampe and Michelle Jackson talk about his project Citizen Interaction Design, which she participated in as a student; Tati Calixto and a few of her students share their experiences in Cusco, Peru as participants in an effort to preserve the traditional weaving practices in the region; and Preet Rana, Kate Saylor, Amby Gallagher and Norma Sarkar discuss their efforts to make their course, Community Health Nursing, a true global experience. 
The Learning in Real Life series is sponsored by the U-M Library, the Center for Engaged Academic Learning, and the Vice Provost for Global and Engaged Education.

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Last modified: 03/30/2015

Emergent Research: Research with Material Objects

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
February 23, 2015
Running Time: 
98:40

This cross-disciplinary panel discusses trends, issues, and challenges of doing research with material culture and material objects. Panelists also address the role of technology in facilitating their research process. Panelists include: Katie Lennard, PhD Candidate, Department of American Culture Archaeologists have long used artifacts to better understand life in ancient civilizations, but how can historians of the 19th and 20th century US use material goods to gain a new perspective on the more recent past? Katie's dissertation Made in America: Costume, Ritual, and the Ku Klux Klan 1905-1940 tracks the industrial production and national distribution of Ku Klux Klan robes in the early 20th century. This work draws significantly on data from examinations of extant Klan robes held in museum collections, but also relies on more traditional archival research to contextualize these artifacts. Katie's presentation will consider the value of material culture for historians, while also discussing what kind of information artifacts, particularly mass-produced goods, cannot provide. Tim Utter, Manager of the Clark Library Tim Utter is a Map Librarian and Manager of the Clark Library. Tim is very interested in how the variety of ways of seeing and representing place on maps affects our worldview, our shared experience as viewers, the map's story - its history and what it communicates to us, as well as map as cultural beacon. His research interests include Dutch maps of the 16th-17th centuries and pictorial maps. Daniel Fisher, Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Earth and Environmental Sciences, Claude W. Hibbard Collegiate Professor of Paleontology, Curator and Director, Museum of Paleontology Professor Fisher's current research focuses on the paleobiology and extinction of mastodons and mammoths, elucidated by studies of growth increments and compositional time series (isotopic and elemental) sampled from their tusks and cheek teeth. Professor Fisher’s work on individual specimens and sites often involves construction of 3D models. While he typically works with these using specialized graphics software, he and his students are beginning to use formats that permit more general access, such as a "3D pdf." Another of Professor Fisher's research projects focuses on the baby woolly mammoth named Lyuba. At a recent annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, he and his colleagues (Shirley et al. 2011) presented results derived from CT scans of this specimen, some of which were used to create animations such as this: Lyuba CT Scan.

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Last modified: 03/26/2015

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