Videos

Authors' Forum: Elephants and Kings: An Environmental History

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
January 28, 2016
Running Time: 
76:48

Thomas Trautmann, U-M professor emeritus of history and anthropology, talks about his recent book, Elephants and Kings: An Environmental History, and is then joined in conversation by cultural anthropologist Andrew Shryock, Chair and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Anthropology at U-M.
Because of their enormous size, elephants have long been irresistible for kings as symbols of their eminence. In early civilizations—such as Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Indus Civilization, and China—kings used elephants for royal sacrifice, spectacular hunts, public display of live captives, or the conspicuous consumption of ivory—all of them tending toward the elephant’s extinction. The kings of India, however, as Trautmann shows in this study, found a use for elephants that actually helped preserve their habitat and numbers in the wild.

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Last modified: 02/02/2016

Emergent Research: Professor Alex Stern - Doing Digital Humanities Projects with Sensitive Health Data: Opportunities and Challenges

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
January 25, 2016
Running Time: 
80:24

How do you create an interactive and multi-modal digital platform about histories of eugenics and sterilization with restricted historical records? This talk reviews my team’s creation of a dataset of 20,000 sterilization recommendations processed by the state of California from the 1920s and 1950s, and discuss how we are building digital platforms with Mapquest and Scalar that seek to convey complex demographic patterns, institutional histories, and personal experiences of reproductive loss. In this talk we will explore varied issues including interdisciplinary collaboration, document preservation and management, and digital storytelling.

Alexandra Minna SternAlexandra Minna Stern, Ph.D. is Professor of American Culture, with appointments in Obstetrics and Gynecology, History, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. She also is a core faculty member in the Latina/o Studies Program; the Science, Technology, and Society Program; directs the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies/Brazil Initiative, and co-directs the Reproductive Justice Faculty Program at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Her research has focused on the uses and misuses of genetics in the United States and Latin America. She is the author of Eugenic Nation: Faults and Frontiers of Better Breeding in Modern America (University of California Press, 2005), which won the American Public Health Association’s Arthur Viseltear Award for outstanding contribution to the history of public health, and is coming out in a 2nd and expanded edition in December 2015. Her latest book, Telling Genes: The Story of Genetic Counseling in America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012) is a Choice 2013 Outstanding Academic Title in Health Sciences. She has held numerous grants for her work in medical history and health policy, including from the National Endowment for the Humanities (1 for digital archiving), National Institutes of Health, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She is currently leading a project to create a dataset of 20,000 eugenic sterilization orders processed by the state of California in the 20th century and is principal investigator on 2 Ford Foundation grants to assess the status of reproductive justice and LBGTQ youth and youth of color empowerment in Michigan.

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Last modified: 02/02/2016

Curator Talk: Shakespeare on Page and Stage: Exhibit Opening

Date: 
January 22, 2016
Running Time: 
66:00

Exhibit Curators Pablo Alvarez and Juli McLoone talk about the making and content of the exhibit Shakespeare on Page and Stage. The exhibit and talk are part of a series of nationwide events to commemorate the four-hundredth anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare.

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Last modified: 02/02/2016

Authors' Forum: The Cherokee Rose: A Novel of Gardens and Ghosts, Tiya Miles

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
January 20, 2016
Running Time: 
82:48

Tiya Miles and Martha Jones discuss The Cherokee Rose, Miles's novel that examines a little-known aspect of America’s past—slaveholding by Southern Creeks and Cherokees—and its legacy in the lives of three young women who are drawn to the Georgia plantation where scenes of extreme cruelty and equally extraordinary compassion once played out. Followed by a book signing, with books for sale by Common Language Bookstore.
Tiya Miles is a professor in the Department of American Culture, Department of Afro-American and African Studies, Department of History, Department of Women's Studies, and Native American Studies Program.
Martha Jones is an Arthur F Thurnau Professor of History in the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies and part of the Law School's Affiliated LS&A Faculty. She is co-director of the Michigan Law Program in Race, Law & History.

 

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Last modified: 02/02/2016

Who Will Be Next: A Discussion on the Impact of Race and Ethnicity on Elections

Date: 
January 14, 2016
Running Time: 
97:48

Faculty, students and community activists speak about the impact that race and ethnicity have on voting patterns and politics, including the upcoming American Presidential election.
Presented by the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies and the NAACP-UM Chapter.

 

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Last modified: 02/02/2016

Authors' Forum Presents: Vox Popular, The Surprising Life of Language in the Media

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
December 2, 2015
Running Time: 
84:36

The creative decisions behind voices in our favorite movies and TV shows—such as what accent or dialect to use—offer rich data for sociolinguistic study. Robin Queen, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Linguistics, English Languages and Literatures, and Germanic Languages and Literatures, and Anne Curzan, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of English, talk about Queen's book Vox Popular: The Surprising Life of Language in the Media.
Anne is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of English at the University of Michigan. She also holds faculty appointments in the Department of Linguistics and the School of Education.

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Last modified: 12/08/2015

Jan Longone on Dining Out

Jan Longone on Dining Out
Date: 
November 12, 2015
Running Time: 
69:57

Historian and Curator Jan Longone talks about her exhibit Dining Out: Menus, Chefs, Restaurants, Hotels, & Guidebooks, which is on display in the Clark Library on the 2nd floor of the Hatcher Graduate Library. The wide-ranging exhibit celebrates the history of the eating out experience.

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Last modified: 11/20/2015

Authors' Forum Presents: From Bombay to Bollywood

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
November 11, 2015
Running Time: 
79:48

In his book, From Bombay to Bollywood: The Making of a Global Media Industry, Aswin Punathambekar analyzes the transformation of the national film industry in Bombay into a transnational and multi-media cultural enterprise, which has come to be known as Bollywood. Combining ethnographic, institutional, and textual analyses, he explores how relations between state institutions, the Indian diaspora, circuits of capital, and new media technologies and industries have reconfigured the Bombay-based industry’s geographic reach. Punathambekar is joined in conversation with Madhumita Lahir.Aswin Punathambekar is associate professor of communication studies at U-M. He is the co-editor of Global Bollywood (NYU Press, 2008). Madhumita Lahir is assistant professor of English at U-M.

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Last modified: 11/24/2015

Authors’ Forum Presents: Photographic Architecture in the Twentieth Century

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
October 28, 2015
Running Time: 
84:00

Claire Zimmerman, associate professor of history of art and architecture, talks with Krisztina Fehérváry, assistant professor of anthropology, about Zimmerman's book,Photographic Architecture in the Twentieth Century. In her book, Zimmerman reveals how photography profoundly influenced architectural design in the past century, playing an instrumental role in the evolution of modern architecture.

 

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Last modified: 10/29/2015

Faculty Panel: Multiracialism Informing Academic Work

Date: 
October 26, 2015
Running Time: 
94:12

What Does it Mean to be Multiracial in a Monoracial World?

Part of a year-long series of events that explore what it means to be multiracial in a monoracial world. This faculty panel includes:
Martha Jones, Prof. of History and Afroamerican & African Studies, co-director of the Michigan Law Program in Race, Law & History. Dr. Jones’ scholarly interests include the history of race, citizenship, slavery, and the rights of women in the United States and the Atlantic world.
Edward West, Thurnau Prof. of Art and Design. Professor West’s photographs and writing examine the lives and experiences of multiracial people around the world. His recent exhibit and publication, So Called, drew from his travels around the world photographing multiracial people.
Mark Kamimura-Jimenez, Director, Graduate Student Success, Rackham Graduate School, Lecturer, Oakland University. Dr. Kamimura-Jimenez’s research examines the college experience for multiracial students.

 

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Last modified: 10/27/2015

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