Videos

Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution

photo courtesy of Nathaniel Philbrick
Date: 
February 19, 2014
Running Time: 
79:00

New York Times bestselling author Nathaniel Philbrick talks about his research at the Clements Library and the Revolutionary war documents that were helpful in writing his book Bunker Hill.

Philbrick is the author of In the Heart of the Sea, winner of the National Book Award; Mayflower, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; Sea of Glory, winner of the Roosevelt Naval History Prize; Bunker Hill; The Last Stand; Why Read Moby-Dick; and Away Off Shore.

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Last modified: 02/25/2014

Engaged Educational Opportunities for Graduate Students

Date: 
February 13, 2014
Running Time: 
69:00

Cliff Lampe and Joyojeet Pal, School of Information faculty, and Elizabeth Werbe, associate director of Rackham’s Arts of Citizenship program, highlight several projects and programs that enable graduate students to address real-world challenges as part of their research, teaching, and coursework. The panel also addresses the value of such opportunities for professional development and growth, as well as how these experiences can help graduate students become better researchers and teachers.

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Last modified: 02/25/2014

Poverty in Southeast Michigan

Photo by Aaron Harmon
Date: 
February 13, 2014
Running Time: 
83:30

Sandra Danziger (School of Social Work), Kristin Seefeldt (School of Social Work), and Sarah Burgard (Sociology) discuss poverty in southeast Michigan in the wake of the Great Recession that ended in 2009.

They present information from the first two waves of the Michigan Recession and Recovery Survey, a stratified random sample of households in Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties. They also highlight findings on employment, income, safety net program participation, material hardships, and health and mental health, particularly among low income households.

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Last modified: 02/25/2014

Author’s Forum Presents Dear Edward: Family Footprints

cover of Dear Edward: Family Footprints
Date: 
February 12, 2014
Running Time: 
1:23:30

Photographer Paul Weinberg discusses his new book with U-M Professor Daniel Herwitz. "Dear Edward: Family Footprints" is a personal journey into family archives; it explores Weinberg's past as he retraces his family's footprints to far-flung small towns in the interior of South Africa—where his ancestors found a niche in the hotel trade. Part visual narrative and part multilayered travel book, this record is organized in the form of postcards to Weinberg's great grandfather, Edward. Weaving history, historiography, and memoir into a personal pilgrimage, it sets up a dialogue between the past and present and questions who records history and who is left out of it.

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Last modified: 02/25/2014

The Janus of Tiger: Korean Decorative Painting, Magpie and Tiger

Tiger and Magpie; a Korean folk painting drawn during the Joseon Dynasty of Korea (1392-1910); Wikimedia, U.S. public domain
Date: 
February 6, 2014
Running Time: 
93:30

Byung-Mo Chung, professor at Gyeongju University, is the first scholar to travel the world to propagate and research the value and meanings of Korean traditional decorative art culture. In traditional Korean folk paintings, tigers appear as Janus-faced creatures, with one side a beast with a merciless savage nature and the other side a humane animal. The two contrasting images of the fierce animal have been a distinctive feature of Korean art which is rarely seen in other countries. Tiger and magpie folk paintings in Korea present tigers as silly, comic characters. What made the painters depict the fearful beast as a cute, ludicrous pet-like animal? The tiger and magpie provides a valuable clue for viewers to delve into the cultural identity of Korean people and their aesthetic sensibility.

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Last modified: 02/18/2014

Can a Plantation Be Fair? Fair Trade and Darjeeling Tea Production

Bookcover of The Darjeeling Distinction
Date: 
January 23, 2014
Running Time: 
69:00
Sarah Besky, author of The Darjeeling Distinction, explores the frictions between fair trade and the plantation system and highlights how, in India, fair trade undermines existing state welfare structures.
 
 
Fair trade, organic, shade grown – on a trip to the supermarket, these labels guide our purchasing and attest to the conditions of production of the products they adorn; conditions that we believe are better as the result of our purchases. “Fair trade plantation” may seem like an oxymoron, as plantation workers are not cooperative farmers – they are industrial laborers who have little capacity to make democratic decisions in the face of the plantation’s structural oppression. In the late 1990s, however, tea plantations in Darjeeling, high up in the Himalayan foothills of Northeast India, became the first plantations in the world to receive fair trade certification. Hope was high among certifying agencies that fair trade would alleviate the inequities of tea production. Despite these hopes, the region’s plantation laborers, who produce some of the world’s most expensive tea, remain some of the tea industry’s worst paid workers.
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Last modified: 02/11/2014

War on Poverty Panel

Date: 
January 22, 2014
Running Time: 
83:30

Martin Luther King's final book, "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community," articulated a critique of the War on Poverty and related programs. Pointing to the inadequacy of funding and the lack of coordination among federal programs aimed at eradicating poverty, he argued for guaranteed income for all Americans. On this 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, we revisit this program and its impact in the context of King's argument.

 

The panel includes Martha Bailey (Economics)—the history of the War on Poverty, Robert Mickey (Political Science)—the legislation from the perspective of race, Mary Corcoran (Political Science, Public Policy)—gender and poverty, and Laura Lein (Social Work, Anthropology)—the effects of welfare reform on women in poverty. Deborah Keller-Cohen (Linguistics, Women's Studies) moderates.

 

This panel discussion is presented by the Institute for Research on Women and Gender with the Department of Women's Studies as part of the annual MLK Symposium.

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Last modified: 02/04/2014

UM3D Lab Winter 2014 Open House

Date: 
January 17, 2014
Running Time: 
29:24

Curious about new technologies, or have a project in mind but not sure where to start? The UM3D Lab Winter Open House features demonstrations of Virtual Reality, Rapid Prototyping, Motion Capture, 3D Scanning, Mobile Development, Animations, and more.

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Last modified: 02/04/2014

Maps and Mapmaking in India: Exhibit Opening

Date: 
January 16, 2014
Running Time: 
16:00

Maps of India are presented in conjunction with the winter 2014 Literature, Science, and the Arts (LSA) theme semester “India in the World.”

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Last modified: 01/21/2014

Translation for Vulnerable Times: Homer's Iliad and Virgil's Aeneid

Bookcovers: Iliad & Aeneid
Date: 
January 13, 2014
Running Time: 
82:00

Stanley Lombardo, professor of classics at Kansas University, reads from his translation of Homer's Iliad (1997), and Sarah Ruden, poet and translator, reads from her translation of Virgil's Aeneid (Yale 2008). They discuss the creative process of translating classical epic poems from ancient Greek and Latin into English for modern readers. Moderated by U-M Professor Yopie Prins and sponsored by Contexts for Classics at the University of Michigan.

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Last modified: 01/14/2014

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