Videos

On the University of Michigan, the Peace Corps, and the Enduring Bonds of Students and Teachers

Date: 
February 11, 2015
Running Time: 
77.00

Former U-M undergraduate student and current U-M professor Brian Arbic describes his experience as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer teacher in Liberia and Ghana, West Africa. He also describes a surprise reunion with his prize pupil from Ghana, Joseph Ansong, 20 years later, and how it led to Ansong's hiring by Arbic's lab in the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies. Ansong will add to the conversation.

Page maintained by Jeff Collins
Last modified: 02/12/2015

All the Trees of the Forest: The Extraordinary Story of Israel's Woodlands

Series: 
PitE, SNRE Event
Date: 
January 27, 2015
Running Time: 
70.8

Dr. Alon Tal, Associate Professor of Desert Ecology at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and a visiting scholar at Michigan State University, talks about his 2013 book.
Israel’s woodlands carry the scars of past military invaders and conquests. But most of the trees in Israel’s forests are contemporary and represent an expression of recent national zeal to restore the woodlands of the Bible, making a harsh climate more hospitable.
Drawing on insider anecdotes, Tal describes how the trial and error process evolved that transformed drylands and degraded soils into flourishing parks, rangelands, and renewed ecosystems in a degraded countryside and how it might be relevant in the dozens of dryland countries suffering from deforestation and desertification.

 

Page maintained by Jeff Collins
Last modified: 01/27/2015

Emergent Research: Systematic Reviews

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
January 26, 2015
Running Time: 
96:00

Informationists Mark MacEachern and Whitney Townsend, Taubman Health Sciences Library, offer overview of the systematic review publication type and discuss appropriate literature search methodologies, while describing their experiences working on these project teams and teaching a grant-supported CE workshop for librarians on the topic.
A systematic review is a type of research publication that has become an integral part of the health sciences and other fields. As a publication that relies heavily on literature searches, systematic reviews provide information professionals with an opportunity to significantly contribute to and impact the resulting research. A special focus will be placed on the flow and management of information through the systematic review process, and on the role of librarians in the identification, production, and assessment of these research publications.

Page maintained by Jeff Collins
Last modified: 02/06/2015

Translation at Work: Promoting Translated Literature in the U.S.

Series: 
Translation at Work
Date: 
January 22, 2015
Running Time: 
85.8

This is one in a series of panels on the practice of literary translation presented by the Department of Comparative Literature as part of its ongoing effort to promote translation in all its forms across the U-M campus. Students can come to meet people working with literature outside of academia and learn about potential alternatives to an academic career. 

Panelists Include: Esther Allen, a distinguished translator and writer, teaches at Baruch College (CUNY) and serves on the board of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA). Laurence Marie is a culteral attaché at the Embassy of France in the United States and the Head of French Book Office in New York City. Jadranka Vrsalocic-Carevic, a translator and editor, is the director of the New York office of the Institut Ramon Lull, an agency responsible for the promotion of Catalan language and culture abroad. Etienne Charriere moderates the discussion.

Page maintained by Jeff Collins
Last modified: 01/23/2015

The Components of Reputation: Searching for a Bicentennial Narrative for the University of Michigan

The Components of Reputation
Series: 
Clements Library
Date: 
January 20, 2015
Running Time: 
54.88

Francis X. Blouin Jr., U-M Professor of History and Professor in the School of Information talks about The Components of Reputation: Searching for a Bicentennial Narrative for the University of Michigan.
The University of Michigan was transformed in the late nineteenth century. Scholars at a handful of universities that would include the UM systematically reconsidered the relative importance of science and religion to how we understand the world around us. This discussion broadened the idea of and the application of science beyond an interest in natural phenomena. Out of these discussions came the very idea of the modern research university that persists today.

Page maintained by Jeff Collins
Last modified: 01/20/2015

Cities Divided: The Persistence of Segregation in the American Metropolis

Cities Divided
Date: 
January 15, 2015
Running Time: 
108:35

In honor of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, this open conversation examines the causes, and explores potential solutions, to the persistence of segregation in U.S. cities.
With a focus on Detroit, we welcome guest speakers from the Michigan Roundtable. Panelists include: Melba Joyce Boyd, Professor and Chair of Africana Studies, Wayne State University, Margaret Brown, Executive Director of the Fair Housing Center, Detroit, Alex Hill, Community Health Worker and Research Project Coordinator, Wayne State University, Harley Etienne, Assistant Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Michigan, and Stacey Stevens, Manager Racial Equity Community Engagement Round Table, Detroit.

 

Page maintained by Jeff Collins
Last modified: 01/20/2015

Culinary collection digital exhibit reception: Jell-O

Culinary collection digital exhibit reception: Jell-O
Series: 
Culinary Collection
Date: 
January 12, 2015
Running Time: 
39:34

To kick off a new digital exhibit, "Jell-O: America’s Most Famous Dessert At Home Everywhere", Dr. Nicole Tarulevicz of the School of Humanities at the University of Tasmania provides some historical perspective on Jell-O brand gelatin in America and abroad.
Using materials drawn from the culinary ephemera holdings of the Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive at U-M Library, the exhibit explores how the Jell-O company’s early 20th century advertising used depictions of the exotic to sell the product to Americans. The ads included lavishly illustrated scenes of imagined food preparation and consumption around the world, some created by noted contemporary artists.

 

Page maintained by Jeff Collins
Last modified: 01/20/2015

Myths And Realities Of Youth Sport Head Injuries

Series: 
LSA Theme Semester Sport and the University
Date: 
December 8, 2014
Running Time: 
77:40

Dr. Jeff Kutcher, Director of the Michigan NeuroSport Program and Associate Professor in the U-M Department of Neurology, talks about concussion research. Sponsored by the University Library and the LSA Theme Semester Sport and the University.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 12/10/2014

This Is America: Jimi Hendrix’s Reimaginings Of The Star-Spangled Banner As Social Commentary

Series: 
The Star Spangled Banner, 200th Anniversary
Date: 
December 5, 2014
Running Time: 
66:59

U-M Professor of Musicology Mark Clague talks about Jimi Hendrix's version of The Star Spangled Banner, "This is America." Celebrating the bicentennial of the U.S. National Anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner” (1814–2014), this exhibit illustrates the cultural history of the national anthem in American life. An original 1814 sheet music imprint of "The Star-Spangled Banner," one of about a dozen known surviving issues, is on display in the Audubon Room.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 12/10/2014

Author's Forum Presents: The Infinitesimals

Series: 
Author's Forum
Date: 
December 1, 2014
Running Time: 
70:04

Author, Laura Kasischke and Megan Levad talk about Kasischke's latest book of poetry, The Infinitesimals. Laura Kasischke is Allan Seager Collegiate Professor of English Language & Literature at U-M. Recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, 2012, she has published nine novels, three of which have been made into feature films—The Life Before Her Eyes, Suspicious River, White Bird in a Blizzard—and eight books of poetry. Megan Levad is the assistant director of the Helen Zell Writers’ Program at U-M. Her poems have appeared in American Letters & Commentary, AnOther, Denver Quarterly, among other publications and anthologies. She also writes lyrics for composers Tucker Fuller and Kristin Kuster

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 12/10/2014

Pages