Videos

Adventures in Videoland: The Fun and Trouble of Researching Small-Town Video Stores

Date: 
April 11, 2014
Running Time: 
56:57

U-M faculty member Daniel Herbert presents material from his book "Videoland: Movie Culture at the American Video Store" (UC Press, 2014), which details the impact video rental stores had on movie culture over the last several decades.

Herbert focuses on his examination of small-town video stores and their workers. For many years, rural Americans accessed movie culture at their local, independently-owned video shops. This talk highlights the adventure of getting to these places and the pleasures of interviewing these workers, and shows how these places synthesized “Hollywood” with contemporary small-town life.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 04/15/2014

Coming Out Swiss: In Search of Heidi, Chocolate and My Other Self

Coming Out Swiss bookcover, University of Wisconsin Press
Date: 
April 9, 2014
Running Time: 
77:56

Anne Hermann is working on a book about Switzerland — a work of creative non-fiction that engages with questions of citizenship, cultural production and belonging, and the politics of language within a changing Europe. She engages in discussion with Helmut Puff, whose teaching and research focus on German literature, history, and culture in the late medieval and early modern period. Book sales by Common Language Bookstore.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 04/15/2014

Radiation mapping is too important to be left to experts: the role of maps in Japan after March 11, 2011

Japan Radiation Map from GoogleEarth
Date: 
April 7, 2014
Running Time: 
79:09

Jean-Christophe Plantin talks about how traditional "critical cartography" assumes that maps can either serve the interests of those in power or empower those seeking social justice, and how this ambivalence in cartography is present in contemporary web-based mapping applications.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 04/15/2014

Author's Forum: Elias Khoury

Bookcover of Sinalkul, contemporary Arabic fiction by Elias Khoury
Date: 
April 3, 2014
Running Time: 
79:59

A discussion, in Arabic, of Elias Khoury's fiction and writing, as well as his attitude toward classical and Arabic poetry. This event is supported by the Babtain Program for Arabic Language and Literature, in collaboration with the Institute for the Humanities/Author’s Forum.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 04/08/2014

The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution and the Fate of the Empire

Date: 
April 2, 2014
Running Time: 
72:37

Author Andrew Jackson O'Shaughnessy challenges the stereotype that Britain should have won the Revolutionary War and that its failure to do so was due to the incompetence of commanders and politicians. He offers a very different explanation of why Britain lost the American War of Independence. O'Shaughnessy is the Saunders Director of the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello and Professor of History at the University of Virginia. Lecture series sponsored by the Clements Library.

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Last modified: 04/08/2014

Author's Forum: The Imperative of Integration

Detail of bookcover, The Imperative of Integration, Princeton University Press
Date: 
March 19, 2014
Running Time: 
66:03
Elizabeth Anderson, John Rawls Collegiate Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies at U-M, reads from her recent book, The Imperative of Integration, which exposes the profoundly detrimental effects that continued segregation has had on our society. Elizabeth Hinton, a member of the Society of Fellows and a faculty member in the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at U-M will join Anderson in discussion. Book sales provided by Common Language Bookstore.
 
According to Princeton University Press, “This book provides a compelling argument for reviving the ideal of racial integration to overcome injustice and inequality, and to build a better democracy.”
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Last modified: 03/25/2014

Beautiful Books, Subversive Ideas

Handmade bookcover, courtesy of Ediciones Vigía
Date: 
March 14, 2014
Running Time: 
64:42
Cuban book artist Rolando Estévez, speaking Spanish with simultaneous English translation, talks about the role of handmade books in Cuba and in the world today.
 
Estévez, the artistic founding director of Ediciones Vigía, an artisanal press in Matanzas, Cuba, provides a retrospective of his work for Vigía, as well as discussing and displaying his newest one-of-a-kind books that give expression to his unique visual poetics. He presents, for the first time, an artist book about Hemingway and the legacy of his presence in Cuba.
 
As our society moves toward digital books and the idea of the book as virtual rather than tactile, the role of handmade books has become a fascinating publishing phenomenon transforming how we think about literary texts.
Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 03/17/2014

Third Year Memorial of the Great East Japan Earthquake

Japanese coastal town of Otsuchi days after the earthquake; Al Jazeera English via Flickr; BY-SA 2.0
Date: 
March 11, 2014
Running Time: 
82:43

Michigander Paul Fales shares his experience in Japan when it was ravaged by a huge tsunami, earthquake, and Fukushima nuclear accident three years ago. Fales was serving as an English teacher when the earthquake and tsunami hit the city, Kesennuma, where he was stationed. He was found by CNN a few days after the disaster.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 03/17/2014

Should academics get down and dirty with YouTube?

riskbites
Date: 
February 24, 2014
Running Time: 
81:28

Is there a role for academic institutions in online informal education? Andrew D. Maynard, Director of the Risk Science Center in the U-M School of Public Health, talks about the growing trend in online video being used as an informal education source by individuals. He produces entertaining "Risk Bites" videos, which cover topics that deal with the science behind how we understand and address risks to our health.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 03/06/2014

Author's Forum: Darktown Follies

Darktown Follies bookcover; Tupelo Press
Date: 
February 21, 2014
Running Time: 
50:15

Amaud Jamaul Johnson reads from Darktown Follies, his daring and surprising new collection of poems that respond to Black Vaudeville, specifically the personal and professional challenges African American variety performers faced in the early twentieth century.

Johnson is fascinated by jokes that aren’t funny — particularly, what it means when humor fails or reveals something unintended about our national character. Darktown Follies is an act of self-sabotage, a poet’s willful attempt at recklessness, abandoning the “good sense” God gave him, as an effort to explore the boundaries and intersections of race and humor.

Page maintained by Zoe Crowley
Last modified: 03/04/2014

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