Videos

Who is this Jack Carney?: Lecture by James Curry

Date: 
April 27, 2015
Running Time: 
75:00

Dublin native James Curry, history and digital humanities doctoral scholar at the National University of Ireland Galway, gives an introduction to the Jack Carney papers held in the Joseph A. Labadie Collection of the Special Collections Library. Carney was a left-wing journalist who edited or wrote for various labor, socialist and communist newspapers in Ireland, Britain and America during the decades prior to his death in London in 1956.
The Jack Carney papers were donated to the Joseph A. Labadie Collection by Virginia Hyvarinen. Named for Detroit labor organizer and anarchist Joseph Antoine Labadie (1850-1933), the Labadie Collection documents the history of social protest movements and marginalized political communities from the 19th century to the present.

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Last modified: 04/27/2015

Emergent Research Lecture with Charles Burant

Series: 
Emergent Research
Date: 
April 27, 2015
Running Time: 
81:10

Charles F. Burant presents the Emergent Research lecture for April. Dr. Burant's clinical interests are in the area of metabolic syndromes and management of Type II Diabetes. His research laboratory investigates the mechanisms of insulin resistance and utilizes animal models of diabetes to identify pathways important in understanding diabetes progression. His lab also studies adult pancreatic progenitor cells and how they might be used to generate new insulin secreting beta-cells.
Burant is the Dr. Robert C. and Veronica Atkins Professor of Metabolism, Professor of Internal Medicine, and Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology at the University of Michigan.

 

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Last modified: 04/28/2015

The Kwangju Massacre after Thirty-Five Years: The Politics and Poetics of Witnessing: A Conversation with South Korean Writers LIM Chul-Woo and HAN Kang

Date: 
April 24, 2015
Running Time: 
116:40

South Korea’s vaunted path to democratizationwound through the city of Kwangju, where the blood of civilians massacred by the military bathed the streets in May of 1980. As a turning point in the history of the country’s struggle for democracy, Kwangju has been variously commemorated and contested in the shifting tides of Korean politics ever since. Approaching the thirty-fifth anniversary of the momentous event, acclaimed Korean writers LIM Chul-Woo and HAN Kang engage in a rare cross-generational conversation about the writer’s craft in the age of state terror, and ruminate on the meanings of Kwangju past and present after reading from their works of fiction, The Red Room (1988), and The Boy (2014).

Host Department: Nam Center for Korean Studies

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Last modified: 04/24/2015

The Birds and The Beasts: Audubon's Masterpieces at the University of Michigan

Date: 
April 22, 2015
Running Time: 
77:40

The University of Michigan Library and the Clements Library celebrate the acquisition of John James Audubon's The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America with a viewing and panel discussion.

Panelists include: J. Kevin Graffagnino, Director, William L. Clements LibraryMartha Conway, Director, Special Collections LibraryCathleen Baker, Conservation Librarian, University LibraryClayton Lewis, Curator of Graphics, Clements Library  [moderator]

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Last modified: 04/24/2015

Caravana 43: State Violence in Mexico

Date: 
April 11, 2015
Running Time: 
72:00

On September 26, 2014, 43 students from a rural teacher training school were disappeared by the Mexican State. Their parents and classmates took up the fight to demand that they be returned alive. Parents and student survivors share their stories and struggle for justice.
This event is in Spanish with English translation. 

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Last modified: 04/14/2015

Authors' Forum: Merce Cunningham's Diaries: A Conversation with Laura Kuhn and Peter Sparling

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
April 8, 2015
Running Time: 
67:20

Writer, director and performer Laura Kuhn talks with Peter Sparling, U-M dance professor, about the diaries of the dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham.
Cunningham kept a daily diary, both personal and chronicling the doings of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, from the early 1970s until he died in 2009.

 

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Last modified: 04/10/2015

Archiving the Digital Ephemeral: Social Movements, Community Groups, Artists, and Web-based Content

Date: 
April 6, 2015
Running Time: 
82:20

Howard Besser, Director of Moving Image Archiving & Preservation at New York University and Professor Emeritus of Information Studies at UCLA, discusses issues and challenges around archiving ephemeral content such as flyers, leaflets, artist drafts, schedules, and photographs, which lie at the heart of how scholars have studied social movements, com

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Last modified: 04/14/2015

Crossing the Gulf: Cuba, Louisiana, and the Diaspora of Saint-Domingue/Haiti

Date: 
April 2, 2015
Running Time: 
81:00

Rebecca Scott, U-M Charles Gibson Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Law and co-author of Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation, explores the itinerary of one woman – Adélaïde Métayer/Durand – whose journey in the aftermath of the Haitian Revolution illuminates the thin line between slavery and freedom. As she moved from one jurisdiction to another, Adélaïde’s status crossed and re-crossed that thin line, amidst great dangers for the children whose status was contingent upon hers.
Despite its famous storms, the Gulf of Mexico has often served as a pathway for the exchange of people and ideas among the colonies and nations on its shores, including the idea that persons could not be held as property, and that all persons are entitled to the protection of the law.

 

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Last modified: 04/08/2015

Students with Disabilities: Second Annual SpeakABLE Event

Date: 
April 1, 2015
Running Time: 
73:08

The SSD Student Advisory Board sponsors its second annual student speech event, speakABLE, for disability awareness on campus. Second annual Speakable event with presentations from students of the University of Michigan. Presenters on hand include: Erin Donahue, Zach Zert, Jacob Rainey, Carly Halbfinger, Abbie Simone, Ryan Bartholomew, Paige Mittenthal, Drew Clayborn and Lloyd Shelton.

 

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Last modified: 04/14/2015

Authors' Forum: Making Callaloo in Detroit - A Conversation with Lolita Hernandez and Laura Thomas

Series: 
Authors' Forum
Date: 
March 31, 2015
Running Time: 
74:40

Author Lolita Hernandez reads from her new collection of stories, Making Callaloo in Detroit, and is then joined in conversation by Laura Thomas. The daughter of parents from Trinidad and Tobago and St. Vincent, Lolita Hernandez gained a unique perspective on growing up in Detroit. In Making Callaloo in Detroit she weaves her memories of food, language, music, and family into twelve stories of outsiders looking at a strange world, wondering how to fit in, and making it through in their own way.

 

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Last modified: 04/14/2015

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